Undergraduate Course Electives

The following online college courses are undergraduate course electives for the Associate of Science, Associate of Arts, Bachelor's of Science and Bachelor's of Arts degree programs.

General Education Electives (100-200 Level)

Behavioral/Social Science

C04 - Introduction to Psychology  

This is a survey of the field of psychology, including the development of behavior, physiological mechanisms of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, consciousness, learning, memory, personality and mental health.
Credit Hours: 3

C08 - American Government  

This course provides an overview of the structure and operations of the federal government, including constitutional principles, rights and liberties, the political process and the relationships among the three branches of the federal government.
Credit Hours: 3

C11 - Macroeconomics  

This is an introduction to macroeconomic analysis and policy. Examination of the foundation and nature of economic principles as they apply to national output, money and banking, and monetary and fiscal policy is included. The course also focuses on employment, inflation, and economic growth.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: C13

C13 - Microeconomics  

C13, Microeconomics, provides students with a comprehensive overview of the evolution of the US economy and the ways in which people produce, consume, and exchange goods and services. Major economic principles are presented, including supply and demand, economies and diseconomies of scale, competition, and taxation. Students also explore the characteristics of a labor market; the regulatory restrictions of tariffs, quota, and embargo on trade; and how the optimal quantity of public good is determined. Inequity of wealth and the interaction of economic rent, interest, and profit are also discussed.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the key principles of economics.
  • Analyze the concepts related to supply and demand.
  • Describe the impact of market efficiency and government intervention in markets.
  • Describe how public goods and externalities are managed.
  • Discuss consumer behavior and costs of production.
  • Discuss the different market structures.
  • Explain concepts related to a society's distribution of income.
  • Examine the benefits and costs of international trade and trade restrictions.

Credit Hours: 3

SO115 - Essentials of Sociology  

This course provides an overview of the terminology, theories, methodologies, and questions used by sociologists to study how groups, cultures, institutions, norms, and values all work to shape both society as a whole and a single individual's perception of the world.
Credit Hours: 3

Humanities & Fine Arts

HS150 - World Civilizations I  

This course provides a broad survey of world history from pre-historic times to 1800 C.E., examining political, economic, and social structures as well as outstanding cultural expressions of each civilization in art, architecture, literature, and religion.
Credit Hours: 3

HS250 - World Civilizations II  

This course outlines the transitions towards modernization in the 19th and 20th centuries with adoption of industrialization and nationalization in world cultures. The era of the two world wars and the post war trends towards a global civilization are discussed.
Credit Hours: 3

Math/Computer Science

C17 - College Mathematics  

C17, College Mathematics, focuses on the fundamental math concepts through the use of real-world scenarios and step-by-step instruction. Students will perform operations and problem-solving with whole numbers, fractions, percentages, and decimals. Units of time, weight, capacity, length, and mass are applied to mathematical calculations, and basic geometric shapes are categorized. Statistical values for mean, median, mode, and standard deviation are determined, and basic statistical graphs are created. Other topics include ratios, proportions, U.S. Standard and Metric units of measure, algebraic expressions, and equations.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Solve problems with whole numbers.
  • Solve fractions.
  • Solve problems using decimals.
  • Solve problems using ratios, proportions, and percent.
  • Solve problems using measurement and geometry.
  • Solve problems using statistics and probability.
  • Solve problems with integers.
  • Solve linear equations.

Credit Hours: 3

MA140 - Business Analysis  

This course applies algebraic concepts to business problems to develop and improve technical, quantitative, and critical thinking skills in analyzing business issues. The student will learn how to analyze, interpret, and present data sets for solving problems, construct and analyze financial statements, perform ratio analysis, construct the major end-of-period financial statements, prepare invoices, determine simple interest and discounts, calculate compound interest and depreciation, and evaluate inventory levels.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite for MA260

Science

SC140 - Elements of Chemistry  

This course is designed for non-chemistry majors who have little or no chemistry background. The course presents the origins and basic tenets of chemistry as they relate to the environment. Issues such as global warming, energy conservation, and acid rain are also discussed. The course also explores energy sources, organic chemicals, drug designing, composition of foods, and genetic engineering.
Credit Hours: 3

SC160 - Basic Biology  

This course provides an introduction to biology through the study of basic chemical reactions, cell structure and function, biochemical pathways, the physiological processes of the human body, and the basic principles of evolution and ecology.
Credit Hours: 3

SC260 - Introduction to Ecology  

This course explores the natural history of ecology, population ecology, the fundamental principles of ecosystem processes, community and ecosystem development, species adaptation, and global ecology. Emphasis is placed on ecological concepts and the tools of science in applying these concepts.
Credit Hours: 3

 

General Education Electives (300-400 Level)

Behavioral/Social Science

AN310 - Cultural Anthropology  

This is an introduction to the foundations of cultural anthropology, how people behave within the context of individual culture and social structures and how people forge solutions to issues such as resource distribution, ethics and morality, family structures, and politics. Interactions between culture, technology, and social organizations are also examined.
Credit Hours: 3

GE350 - World Geography  

This course is designed to acquaint students with the human and physical attributes that give uniqueness and diversity to world regional patterns on Earth',s surface and to take students around the world in a single semester. World Geography helps the student attain a global perspective from which one can see the world in its uniqueness as well as in its totality through focusing on the spatial interconnections between the human and physical systems of Earth.
Credit Hours: 3

Humanities & Fine Arts

AR300 - Art History  

This is an entry-level survey of art history that begins with primitive cave paintings from Lascoux, France and progresses to 20th century art from around the world. The course covers a variety of artistic movements ranging from Classic Greek, Baroque, and Rococo to the Impressionists.
Credit Hours: 3

EN360 - Technical Communication  

This course examines the process of technical communication with an emphasis on preparing professional communications such as correspondence, proposals, reports, instructions, and manuals. Topics include audience and workplace analysis, the research and writing processes, ensuring usability, and visual forms.
Credit Hours: 3

PY360 - Ethics in Technology  

Using philosophical and professional ethics as its foundation, this course explores the diverse moral issues surrounding the use of computers and information technology today, with an emphasis on ethical issues that have emerged due to the Internet and growth of the computer software industry.
Credit Hours: 3

 

Electives (100-200 Level)

Listed by discipline. Students can choose any course from any discipline, unless the course is already part of the required curriculum.

Accounting

A01 - Introduction to Accounting  

A01, Introduction to Accounting, introduces basic concepts of accounting using a balance of theory and practice. Topics covered include double-entry bookkeeping, the accounting cycle for service and merchandising enterprises, notes and interest, bad debts, merchandise inventory, and accounting for fixed assets.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Apply accounting principles to the accounting equation and balance sheets.
  • Explain the expanded accounting equation and the financial documents involved.
  • Demonstrate the use of a T-Account in recording transactions.
  • Apply accounting principles to the trial balance and financial statements.
  • Apply accounting principles to the processes of journalizing and posting.
  • Apply accounting principles to the adjusting process.
  • Apply accounting principles to the completion of the accounting cycle.
  • Apply accounting principles to the banking.

Credit Hours: 3

A02 - Principles of Accounting I  

Basic principles of financial accounting are studied as a foundation for more advanced study and vocational skill. Areas of emphasis include cash, payroll, and accounting for merchandizing businesses.
Credit Hours: 3

A03 - Principles of Accounting II  

A continuation of the study of basic financial accounting principles as a foundation for more advanced study and vocational skill. Areas of emphasis include acquisition, depreciation, and disposal of long term assets, receivables and payables, inventory, partnerships, corporations, long-term liabilities, the statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, and manufacturing accounting.
Credit Hours: 3

A04 - Intermediate Accounting I  

This is a study of intermediate accounting principles and practices used in financial reporting. A review of financial statements and financial statement analysis is included, as is an exploration of the business valuation process. The complexities in accounts receivable, inventories, long-lived assets and depreciation are also accounted for.
Credit Hours: 3

A06 - Intermediate Accounting II  

A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I, this course places special emphasis on liabilities, bonds, derivatives, leases, income taxes, pensions, postretirement benefits, treasury stock, stock dividends, earnings per share, investments in equity securities, consolidations, the statement of cash flows, inflation, and international financial reporting.
Credit Hours: 3

Business

C01 - Introduction to Business  

C01, Introduction to Business, identifies concepts, principles, and operations of the private enterprise system. Students compare and contrast sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, and they learn the advantages and disadvantages of each. This course also discusses the functions of modern business management, marketing, ethics, and social responsibility. Human resource management and how employers can motivate their employees are described. Bookkeeping, accounting, financial management, and financial statements are also examined.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Define strategy and the strategic management process.
  • Describe external environment and how it affects the decisions and performance of a firm.
  • Describe how a firm analyzes its internal capabilities and why it is essential to an organization.
  • Explain cost leadership and the benefits of the cost leadership strategy.
  • Define product differentiation and explain how it can create economic value.
  • Discuss the strategies of flexibility and real options and how they benefit a firm.
  • Summarize explicit and tacit collusion and the issues associated with the decision to collude.

Credit Hours: 3

C05 - Business Communication  

Business Communication is a practical course that examines principles of communication in the workplace. It introduces you to common formats, such as the memo, letter, and report. It helps you review your writing skills to gain greater mastery of grammar, mechanics, and style. More importantly, it introduces you to the strategies successful business professionals employ for a variety of situations. You are exposed to techniques for writing informational, persuasive, sales, employment, good news, and bad news communications. You gain information on internal and external communication situations and practice audience analysis. You also gain information on the technological tools available to business communicators today. You are introduced to the exciting communication possibilities offered by personal computers, cell phones, videoconferencing, desktop publishing, and other cutting-edge technology. In essence, this course provides you with an introduction to the communication skills needed to enter and advance successfully in your business career.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Evaluate the role and importance of listening and nonverbal communication skills.
  • Explain how to use emotional intelligence in order to build relationships and have effective team communication.
  • Explain how to write effective business communication across cultures.
  • Discuss the AIM strategy for writing business messages to improve readability of the communications.
  • Evaluate the different message tools available to create effective messages.
  • Explain how to communicate professionally in the Social Age with social media.
  • Evaluate the different types of business messages and when each message is appropriate.
  • Describe the process for planning and completing business reports.
  • Explain the process for planning and delivering presentations.

Credit Hours: 3

C07 - Personal Finance  

C07, Personal Finance, will equip you to understand, plan, and manage your personal financial affairs. The course focuses on the development of practical methods of organizing and interpreting your financial information, developing achievable and worthwhile goals, and implementing actionable plans and risk management techniques to meet those goals. Specific topics covered include money management, home and automobile purchasing, insurance, and investing. By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Assess the personal financial planning process, the life cycle of financial plans, and methods of goal achievement.
  • Formulate a budget, record-keeping system, and tax planning strategy based on current financial goals.
  • Develop a cash management strategy and a plan to facilitate the home or automobile buying process.
  • Establish a plan to effectively avoid credit problems and protect yourself against credit card fraud.
  • Evaluate life, health, and property insurance policies to identify the best policies for your needs at the lowest cost.
  • Design a diversified investment portfolio that addresses several different investment objectives.
  • Differentiate between open- and closed-end mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, and direct and indirect real estate investments.
  • Create a financial plan that covers your income needs in retirement and helps protect you and your estate.

Credit Hours: 3

C09 - Principles of Finance  

C09, Principles of Finance, offers a broad overview of corporate finance, including the goals of financial management. Students examine how the information contained in financial statements is used in analysis and forecasting. The topic of valuation is introduced, with a focus on valuing stocks and bonds. Students review the financial manager's role in estimating risk and return, computing cost of capital, evaluating capital structure policies, making investment decisions, and raising capital. Other topics include financial securities and derivatives, long-term and short-term planning, and innovations in corporate finance.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the financial markets and the roles played by their participants.
  • Analyze financial statements.
  • Apply time value of money tools.
  • Apply the principles of risk and return relationships.
  • Apply the tools and processes of capital budgeting.
  • Interpret the types of financing available to a company, their components, and issues associated with them.
  • Explain the models and tools that help manage the flow of funds.
  • Describe how capital structure, dividend policy, and international issues impact the firm.

Credit Hours: 3

C11 - Macroeconomics  

This is an introduction to macroeconomic analysis and policy. Examination of the foundation and nature of economic principles as they apply to national output, money and banking, and monetary and fiscal policy is included. The course also focuses on employment, inflation, and economic growth.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: C13

C12 - Business Law  

C12, Business Law, is designed to familiarize students with various kinds of laws, key elements of the American Constitution, and the concepts of the various schools of jurisprudence. Ethics, values, morality, law, and the various ethical theories are compared and contrasted, and the need for promoting corporate social responsibility is discussed. The elements of tort law, the basic elements of a contract, the sources of laws governing contracts, and the conditions for an offer to be valid are examined. Topics include reality of consent, capacity of minors, consequences of illegal agreements, assignment of rights, transfer of title, and the rights of third parties. Delivery of goods, right to inspection, acceptance and revocation of contract, the remedies available to buyers and sellers, and the nature of property are also discussed.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the legal environment within which United States businesses operate.
  • Describe tort, criminal, and intellectual property law as it applies to business.
  • Explain how contracts and negotiable instruments are used in business transactions.
  • Analyze the legal types and roles of employment relationships.
  • Discuss the organizational types and responsibilities of businesses in the United States.
  • Discuss the role of government in regulating business.
  • Explain how personal and real property law impacts business.
  • Explain the impact that international law has on global business.

Credit Hours: 3

C13 - Microeconomics  

C13, Microeconomics, provides students with a comprehensive overview of the evolution of the US economy and the ways in which people produce, consume, and exchange goods and services. Major economic principles are presented, including supply and demand, economies and diseconomies of scale, competition, and taxation. Students also explore the characteristics of a labor market; the regulatory restrictions of tariffs, quota, and embargo on trade; and how the optimal quantity of public good is determined. Inequity of wealth and the interaction of economic rent, interest, and profit are also discussed.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the key principles of economics.
  • Analyze the concepts related to supply and demand.
  • Describe the impact of market efficiency and government intervention in markets.
  • Describe how public goods and externalities are managed.
  • Discuss consumer behavior and costs of production.
  • Discuss the different market structures.
  • Explain concepts related to a society's distribution of income.
  • Examine the benefits and costs of international trade and trade restrictions.

Credit Hours: 3

C15 - Principles of Management  

C15, Principles of Management, is designed to help students understand the major functions of management (planning, organizing, leading, and controlling) and the significance of each function in relationship to the existence of the company. This course describes how companies use management to set and accomplish goals through individuals, groups, and other types of resources. It also analyzes communication and ethics in the organization. Other topics include decision making, change, employee development, organizational structures, management control, leadership, conflict resolution, information security, and globalization.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the management role and its importance within an organization.
  • Discuss the role that social responsibility and ethics has on managing.
  • Describe decision-making as it relates to management.
  • Describe the role of strategic management and project planning in managing an organization or team.
  • Examine the role that structure and human resources play in managing an organization.
  • Discuss how managers can impact individual and team behavior.
  • Explain theories of and approaches to leadership and motivation.
  • Explain how managers control operations and performance.

Credit Hours: 3

C16 - Principles of Marketing  

This course is designed to engage the student in the fundamentals of marketing, including explanation of rudimentary concepts, description of market selection, analysis of various marketing and management strategies, and integration of the marketing mix. Students focus on concepts that teach them how to create value in a product or service for their customers and build relationships with customers for the purposes of retention and maximization of marketing growth. In addition, students learn what is important to consumers and consider the different environments in which they must operate. It is designed to show today's social, mobile, and digital student population how marketing adds value and how firms maintain and rely on value for establishing lasting relationships with their customers. Furthermore, it explores both fundamentals and new marketing influencers and features comprehensive coverage, with topics like social media and ethics integrated throughout.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Examine the function and role of marketing and its relevance to its environment and its application to market organization.
  • Differentiate how marketing processes operate within legal, social, and global environments.
  • Examine the importance of customer relationships and ultimate decisions of consumers.
  • Develop an understanding about marketing research and branding, which offer insight into consumer behavior.
  • Analyze market differentiation and components of business and marketing plans.
  • Distinguish between product and service marketing and explain associated strategies and transportation logistics.
  • Outline multiple strategies to gain market share, including retailing and wholesaling, advertising and sales promotion, and personal selling and direct marketing.
  • Relate the importance of the marketing function and its implementation and necessity in business decisions and ultimate performance measurement.

Credit Hours: 3

Computer Information Systems

K01 - Windows Operating Systems  

In this course, you will learn how to navigate Windows 10, work with files and folders, and conduct Google searches in Microsoft Edge. You will discover Windows apps, including Windows Entertainment, Information, and Productivity apps. You will also learn about viruses and spyware, along with strategies to protect your computer. Lastly, you will be provided with the knowledge needed to practice advanced resource, performance, and task management.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Navigate Windows 10, create and save documents, and manage a Windows 10 system.
  • Work with files and folders, using File Explorer to display locations, folders, and files.
  • Use Windows 10 backup and recovery tools.
  • Discover Windows Entertainment, Information, and Productivity apps.
  • Practice advanced file management and use search tools in File Explorer.
  • Conduct Google searches in Microsoft Edge and use Windows 10 Utility and Accessibility apps.
  • Discuss viruses and spyware, along with strategies to protect your computer from both types of malware.
  • Understand factors that slow down computers.
  • Use Task Manager, resource and performance monitors, and the services console.

Credit Hours: 3

K02 - MS Office Applications I  

This course, MS Office Applications I, is designed to help the student get started in the world of computing. Students will learn about similarities among Office applications and will focus on Word and Excel, the word processing and spreadsheet programs, respectively, included in Microsoft Office. Upon completion of the course, students will better understand how to gain the most out of their Windows operating system and the applications packaged in Office 2016.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explore the Microsoft Office 2016 Environment and perform basic tasks.
  • Perform commands from the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar and apply formatting in Office Programs.
  • Create a document and use a template, working with text and graphics.
  • Insert and modify text, graphics, text boxes, and drawing objects.
  • Create and modify lists and tab stops and insert a SmartArt graphic and an Online Video.
  • Launch and use Excel Online and Google Sheets.
  • Create, save, and navigate an Excel workbook, using functions, formatting cells, adding cell styles and themes, and charting data in a worksheet.
  • Edit values, construct formulas, and format a worksheet.

Credit Hours: 3

K03 - MS Office Applications II  

This course, MS Office Applications II, is designed to help students expand their knowledge of the world of computing. In this course, students will focus on Access, PowerPoint, and Outlook, which respectively are the database management, presentation, and e-mail/scheduling programs included in Microsoft Office. Access is a database system for retaining and using essential information. PowerPoint is a graphics and audio-visual application and is the most visual and creative of the Microsoft applications. Outlook is an e-mail program used for sending and receiving messages. Each aspect of this course will further hone the students' computing skills and prepare them for full use of the Microsoft Office 2016 package.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the basic terms and uses of Microsoft Access 2016 and PowerPoint 2016.
  • Create new databases, tables, queries, forms, and reports with Access.
  • Create a complete database from a template in Access.
  • Open a new, blank PowerPoint presentation and add content, pictures, and themes.
  • Edit, format, and apply slide transitions to a PowerPoint presentation.
  • Provide an overview of functions and terminology used in Outlook 2016.
  • Manage email with Outlook.
  • Manage records, tasks, and a calendar with Outlook.

Credit Hours: 3

K07 - Computer Programming I  

Computer Programming I is the first of two courses designed to familiarize students with computer programming and Visual C#. In this initial course, students will be exposed to fundamental programming concepts and will be introduced to object-oriented programming by way of the C# development language. Computer Programming I is an ideal choice for business and systems analysts, as well as those simply wishing to learn a programming language.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the general concepts of computer programming, the names of some programming languages, and the two major categories of programs, procedural and object-oriented.
  • Describe the types of programming available using the C# language, the associated terminology, as well as Windows Azure and cloud computing basics.
  • Describe and utilize the Visual Studio 2012 programming environment for creating and testing application code using the Visual C#.
  • Write simple C# apps using code rather than visual programming.
  • Explain the basics of object-oriented programming (OOP), including how to create classes and instantiate objects.
  • Demonstrate the basic functions and interactivity visual programming provides.
  • Apply a wide range of controls, including menus, date/time controls, and ComboBoxes, and Label types to provide for greater end-user interactivity.
  • Explain building classes, controlling access to members of a class and creating constructors, as well as software reusability, data abstraction, and encapsulation.

Credit Hours: 3

K08 - Computer Programming II  

Computer Programming II is the second of two courses designed to familiarize students with computer programming and Visual C#. In this course, students will be exposed to the foundations of the Internet and Web development. The lessons will focus on a variety of critical elements, including arrays and structures; asynchronous programming; styles and validator controls; ASP.NET; the Visual Studio Environment; reading from and writing to data files; the concepts behind object-oriented programming and more.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the basic concepts and logic of computer programming and apply those concepts using Visual C#.net.
  • Outline the basic steps and processes of object-oriented programming (OOP).
  • Describe the characteristics of the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and explain how to navigate through the Solution Explorer, the Toolbox, and the Properties Window of the IDE.
  • Create a simple application in Visual Studio, make corrections and modifications to your simple application, and properly format output text using Console.Write and Console.WriteLine.
  • Describe, compare, and contrast: Classes, Methods, Properties and Instance Variables.
  • Design and create a simple Event-Driven Graphical User Interface (GUI), explain how Auto-Generated GUI Code is created, and give examples of four different Event Handlers.
  • Use control statements and blocks to execute the desired objective of a computer program using Visual C#.
  • Describe, give examples of, and correctly form pseudocode statements.

Credit Hours: 3

K09 - Web Site Design  

The Internet has grown from a small network populated by researchers and military personnel to a vast system of information, interaction, and intelligence we use every day. Nearly everything we do has some involvement with the Internet. Despite the use of other technologies, websites and individual pages are still rooted in simple code language. Hypertext markup language, or HTML, is the name for this relatively simple coding language. This course will help you understand and learn HTML so you can design and build your websites. It isn't hard to learn how to create webpages and understand the code behind them. You don't have to be a skilled programmer to be able to understand HTML and CSS. This course will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need to build and design webpages.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Create a simple HTML webpage that contains lists, links, images, and tables.
  • Recognize how to add forms, extra markup, flash, video, and audio.
  • Make a webpage using CSS rules and CSS elements.
  • Identify elements in HTML5, aspects of design theory, and practical tips for launching a site.
  • Create a professional-looking website.

Credit Hours: 3

K11 - Database Processing  

This course introduces the design and development of databases using data modeling tools, normalization, structured query language (SQL), database application design, and Internet technology.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the term database, what is contained within the database, and tasks necessary to develop a database.
  • Write queries in SQL to retrieve data from single and multiple tables using a variety of the basic commands.
  • Explain the concept of functional dependency, primary keys, candidate keys, composite keys, and the advantages and disadvantages of normalization.
  • Describe the key elements of the E-R model, data modeling processes, and transforming data models into database design.
  • Create table structures, views, and application programming using SQL statements.
  • Discuss the concept of database redesign.
  • Manage multiuser databases and databases with SQL.
  • Discuss web server environments, big data, data warehouses, and business intelligence systems.

Credit Hours: 3

K12 - Systems Analysis and Design  

Systems Analysis and Design offers students a thorough examination of the design and development of information systems following the four phases of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) model. In this course, students will learn how to gather information, structure data, and build and implement information systems of all sizes. They'll learn the ins and outs of project management, and they'll understand the risks project managers take when they skip steps in the interest of saving time or resources. Additionally, students will learn how to communicate strategically, collaborate effectively, and solve problems collectively while working as an active part of a project team.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Understand and explain the importance of taking a systematic approach to information systems development.
  • Describe the systems development life cycle (SDLC) framework as it applies to the development of information systems.
  • Define and describe the inputs, tasks, activities, and deliverables of the four individual phases of the SDLC.
  • Recognize and explain how the results of each SDLC phase impacts the next phase as well as the final project outcome.
  • Describe the role of the systems analyst in information systems development.
  • Identify the key personal and professional qualities that systems analysts need for success.
  • Explain the importance of organizing, communicating, and managing the communications process with all project stakeholders.
  • Describe the essential nature of collaboration in a teamwork environment, particularly during complex information systems development projects.

Credit Hours: 3

Construction

B01 - Introduction to Construction  

An introduction to the construction management program, this course includes discussion of the processes, players, and practices in the construction industry. The history of construction, owners, the design team, and the contracting team, communications and documentation in construction, and the sequence of a project are covered.
Credit Hours: 3

B02 - Construction Materials and Methods  

This is an introduction to the materials and methods used in constructing commercial buildings. Topics covered include foundations, using wood in construction, exterior and interior finishes, brick masonry, stone and concrete masonry, masonry load bearing wall construction, steel frame construction, sitecast and precast concrete framing systems, roofing, glass, windows and doors, cladding systems, interior walls and partitions, ceilings and floors.
Credit Hours: 3

B03 - Drawings and Specifications  

This is an introduction to reading construction blueprints. Topics include lines of construction, scales, types of surveys, off-site and site improvements, foundations and below-grade construction, the structure above grade, plumbing, mechanical, electrical, commercial blueprints, construction offices, manufacturing facilities and warehouses.
Credit Hours: 3

B04 - Safety Planning and Administration  

This is an introduction to the role of safety in the construction industry. Topics include the cost and causes of accidents, ethics and safety, workers compensation, OSHA compliance, safety and health programs and policies, job safety and hazard analysis, accident reporting and record keeping, emergency response plans, total safety management, workplace violence, blood borne pathogens, workplace stress, environmental safety and ISO 14000.
Credit Hours: 3

B05 - Construction Surveying Fundamentals  

This course introduces the use of surveys in commercial, residential, and road construction. Topics include fundamentals of surveying, distance measurement, leveling, angles and theodolites, total stations, traverse surveys and computations, geomatics, global positioning systems, control surveys, highway curves, highway construction surveys, municipal street surveys, pipeline and tunnel surveys, culvert and bridge surveys, building construction surveys, and quantity and final surveys.
Credit Hours: 3

B06 - Cost Estimating  

This is an introduction to the process of estimating the full cost of construction projects. Topics include contracts, bonds, insurance, specifications, overhead and contingencies, labor, equipment, excavation, concrete, masonry, metals, wood, thermal and moisture protection, doors and windows, finishes, electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilating, air conditioning and profit.
Credit Hours: 3

B07 - Project Scheduling  

This course examines the role of the project manager in planning, scheduling and controlling a construction project from start to finish. Topics include Gantt charts, basic networks, the critical path method, precedence networks, resource allocation and leveling, schedule updating and project control, schedule compression, reports and presentations, and construction delay claims.
Credit Hours: 3

B08 - Construction Management  

A capstone course in managing a construction project that provides in-depth coverage of project delivery systems, responsibility and authority, resident project representatives, office responsibilities, records and reports, electronic project administration, specifications and drawings, construction law and labor relations, construction safety, meetings and negotiations, risk allocation and liability sharing, preconstruction operations, planning for construction, scheduling, construction operations, value engineering, measurement and payment, materials and workmanship, change orders and extra work, claims and disputes, and project closeout.
Credit Hours: 3

Criminal Justice

J01 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

Introduction to Criminal Justice, examines the past, present, and future of the American criminal justice system. Topics discussed include how laws are created, the history and types of law enforcement, structure of the court system, and the changing philosophies of the American correctional system. You'll also examine the role of legal precedent, the death penalty, prison life, and the juvenile justice system.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the purpose, components, and methods of the criminal justice system.
  • Describe the purpose, sources, types, and enforcement of laws.
  • Describe the methods of and challenges associated with enforcing the law.
  • Describe the role of the courts and the adjudication process in the US criminal justice system.
  • Explain the role and methods of corrections in the United States.
  • Describe the juvenile justice system.
  • Describe how drug abuse and drug crimes are handled in the criminal justice system.
  • Identify issues and emerging trends in criminal justice.

Credit Hours: 3

J02 - Criminal Law  

This course examines criminal law in the US. It offers an overview of the criminal court system. The course provides a foundation in criminal offenses, as well as defenses that are available to those accused of committing criminal acts. Terrorism and crimes involving multiple offenders are also highlights of this course. Throughout, early common law is compared to modern law.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the elements needed to execute a crime, including mens rea, actus rea, and concurrence.
  • Outline the elements of various degrees of murder and manslaughter.
  • Identify the property invasion crimes of burglary, trespass, vandalism, and criminal mischief.
  • Discuss the differences between common law multiple offenders and modern-day accomplice statutes.
  • Summarize vice crimes and drug offenses.
  • Distinguish among treason, sedition, espionage, sabotage, criminal syndicalism, and other offenses against the state.
  • Distinguish among several types of defenses, including perfect and imperfect defenses.

Credit Hours: 3

J03 - Criminal Procedure  

This course provides an overview of the procedures used to lawfully investigate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals suspected of and accused of violating criminal laws.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Examine the constitutional basis for criminal procedure.
  • Explore remedies for violations of the Constitution, including the Exclusionary Rule.
  • Analyze searches and seizures within the context of the Fourth Amendment.
  • Compare arrest warrants and search warrants.
  • Evaluate the issues involved in warrantless searches and seizures, including the situations in which warrantless arrests may be made.
  • Compare and contrast "stop" and "frisk."
  • Summarize the varieties of regulatory and special needs searches.
  • Examine the constitutionality of interrogations, confessions, and identifications.
  • Construct the pretrial process once a person has been arrested and the roles of the prosecutors, grand juries, and defense attorneys.
  • Evaluate plea bargaining and guilty pleas and the Constitutional protections for the defendant at trial and beyond.

Credit Hours: 3

J04 - Policing  

This course studies of policing, including focused discussions that explain why police organizations differ from other organizations. Emphasis is given to policing in the modern world of technology and terrorism. Police subculture, their discretion and misconduct, US Supreme Court cases that address Constitutional rights, and internal and external measures of accountability are also highlights of this course.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize the role of police in the criminal justice system.
  • Explain how law enforcement agencies differ from other organizations.
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of police discretion.
  • Identify various types of police missions.
  • Analyze the influences of the Fourth Amendment on searches and seizures.
  • Explain the different types of external accountability measures put in place to check police misconduct.
  • Define several typologies proposed by scholars to account for police deviance.
  • Identify the various levels of force police officers use.

Credit Hours: 3

J05 - Corrections  

This course is designed to introduce you to the correctional system in the United States. To this end, you'll explore the American correctional context, correctional practices, and a number of correctional issues and perspectives.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Point out the importance of corrections, the associated laws, and the types of issues.
  • Categorize the types of correction programs, reforms, and the issues in them.
  • Differentiate between the various correctional programs, treatment methods, and the changes made with time.
  • Analyze the corrections used on different convicts and the factors that determine these corrections.
  • Apply the philosophy and knowledge of corrections to initiating the process of reentry.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills.
  • Demonstrate computer and information literacy.

Credit Hours: 3

J06 - Ethics in Criminal Justice  

How ethical are people when no one is looking? Are people more ethical today than previous generations? Are parents directing their children toward ethical conduct? This course will sharpen your awareness of ethical behavior as it applies to criminal justice. You'll engage in focused discussions of Aristotle, Kant, John Stuart Mill, and other renown philosophers. Each lesson provides you the opportunity to work through ethical dilemmas. Then, you'll examine retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation, the four primary theories of punishment. You'll also be exposed to US Supreme Court cases that address Constitutional rights, police misconduct, and the future of ethics.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Distinguish between morals, values, and ethics.
  • Explain the moral virtues concepts espoused by Aristotle.
  • Explain why lying is never permissible in formalism ethics.
  • Contrast utilitarian ethics with the views of Aristotle and Kant.
  • Identify the principles of classical, positivism, structural, and ethical theories of crime causation.
  • Evaluate the ethical dilemmas posed by plea bargaining and sentencing decisions.
  • Discuss ethical issues that arise in correctional facilities.
  • Analyze foreseeable ethical dilemmas that can arise with technological advances.

Credit Hours: 3

J09 - Juvenile Justice  

Many minors commit acts at one time or another that could involve them in the juvenile justice system. Knowledge and understanding of both theory and practice in juvenile justice is important for anyone working in the justice system. Two important differences between juvenile justice and adult justice are that the perpetrators are children, and certain acts that adults can lawfully commit would be crimes if committed by children. Historically, juvenile justice emphasizes the philosophy of rehabilitation more than the adult criminal justice system. Those who work in the juvenile justice system have an opportunity to impact young lives through timely and intelligent intervention and, perhaps, to permanently set juveniles on a path that will be safe and will allow them to grow into responsible and successful citizens.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Identify the fundamentals of juvenile justice system and its historical background.
  • Explain the role of police in preventing drugs and gangs among the juvenile offenders.
  • Recognize court procedures, methods of interventions, and corrections associated with juvenile justice.
  • Distinguish between the issues, proposals for reforms, and factors of victimization for the juvenile offenders.
  • Prepare essays on the juvenile crime problem, safe schools, traumatic events, and legal procedures.

Credit Hours: 3

J10 - Criminal Investigation  

In this course, you'll thoroughly examine the investigation process and situations in which police officers apply specific investigative and information-gathering techniques to meet the evidentiary requirements of specific crimes.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the history of criminal investigation.
  • Explain how a crime is legally established by a criminal investigation.
  • Describe the investigative process and stages of criminal investigation.
  • Describe the various types and forms of physical evidence.
  • Summarize interview and interrogation requirements and techniques.
  • Explain the role of the crime laboratory and forensic sciences.
  • Describe the investigation of violent crime scenes.
  • Outline the investigation of property crime scenes, including computer crime.

Credit Hours: 3

Early Childhood Education

E01 - Careers in Early Childhood Education  

E01 offers a look at the foundations of early childhood education, current trends, and the importance of educating young children from birth to age eight. You will study how to meet the needs of every child in every area of development, background, and ability.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe early childhood education and explain how the current trends reflect the past influences.
  • Explain how to support child development with the use of developmentally appropriate practices.
  • Explain how teachers meet the individual and cultural needs of all of their students.
  • Describe how a teacher can create positive relationships with families and caring communities in the classroom.
  • Design curriculum plans that will enhance learning and development.
  • Utilize effective strategies for teaching various subjects including language arts, math, science, and social studies.
  • Employ effective strategies for helping children become aware of the world around them as well as their own emotions, health, and physical fitness.
  • Describe children's learning and implement appropriate teaching strategies to foster continued growth.

Credit Hours: 3

E02 - Child Development  

This course examines childhood development by observing physical and psychosocial factors that lead to cognitive, language, and literacy development according to a child's age.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe current theories and types of research in early childhood development.
  • Explain sociocultural, economic, emotional, and psychological factors associated with becoming parents.
  • Discuss assessment and care of newborns, health issues involved with infancy, and family changes after the birth of a new child.
  • Use theories related to physical, cognitive, language, and literacy development of toddlers.
  • Apply psychosocial, language, and literacy development in children ages one through three.
  • Recognize expected patterns of physical and motor development in children ages four through five and the major factors that influence them.
  • Identify cognitive development in children ages four through five and physical development in children ages six through nine.
  • State factors influencing emotional, neurological, and motor development in children ages six through nine.

Credit Hours: 3

E03 - Curriculum Development  

This course focuses on the purpose of curriculum, the elements to consider when developing curriculum, and how to meet the needs of all children in your classroom.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) as it relates to curriculum in the early childhood classroom.
  • Plan small and large group activities that are developmentally appropriate.
  • Describe the space and materials needed in an early childhood classroom that complement a child's ability to gain self-regulation.
  • Discuss assessments and evaluations and how to effectively share these with caregivers.
  • Explain the aesthetic and affective domains and how to effectively implement these in DAP.
  • Explain the cognitive and language domains and how to effectively implement these in DAP.
  • Explain the physical and social domains and how to effectively implement these in DAP.
  • Create organized, effective DAP curriculum that integrates play.

Credit Hours: 3

E04 - Guidance and Discipline  

Teachers who love teaching teach children to love learning. Have you ever had a child stick their tongue out at you? How about the eye roll? Behaviors such as those is why courses such as this exist. This course will take you through guidance and discipline, two very important aspects in the world of teaching. In this course, you will study the reasoning behind a child's behavior and explore why a "one size fits all" approach is rarely effective in the classroom.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social development impacting child behavior.
  • Explain ways to prevent discipline problems through the classroom environment and program planning.
  • Describe how desirable behavior can be achieved through effective modeling and communication.
  • Explain how to help children understand and accept limits.
  • Contrast punishment versus discipline.
  • Describe childlike behaviors and unmet needs that lead to behavior problems.
  • Discuss how to meet children's academic, social, cultural, linguistic, stress, and vulnerability needs.
  • Analyze discipline problems from knowledge previously gained.

Credit Hours: 3

E06 - Creative Expression and Play  

Don't you love to watch children while they are playing? Have you ever wondered why play is so important for children and why it is a core component of an early childhood curriculum? This course will show the importance of play and teach students how to integrate play into the art, music, movement, and drama curricula. Creative Expression and Play analyzes the connection between play and creativity and will demonstrate techniques for fostering creativity.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Examine the dimensions of creativity that make it both a thinking process and a feeling process.
  • Explain the different ways play helps young children develop in areas such as cognitive, language, literacy, social, physical, and creative growth.
  • Identify the ways children learn through art.
  • Summarize the educational value of music, movement, dance, and drama.
  • Develop specific teaching strategies that will promote creative thought and expression in children.
  • Analyze teachers' roles in assessing and the influence of culture on children's creativity.
  • Explain key features of creative environments.
  • Examine the different types of play and learning materials for young children of various ages.

Credit Hours: 3

E08 - Health, Safety, and Nutrition  

The student will study how the topics of health, safety, and nutrition are interrelated; how to assess children's health; how to plan for safety and attend to children's injuries; and how to foster nutritious eating habits.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize how to promote nutrition and wellness.
  • Explain the difference between good health and chronic conditions based on health assessments.
  • Describe communicable diseases and the steps for identification and control.
  • Defend how quality environments and safe management practices promote effective classroom instruction.
  • Construct safety and emergency steps for initiation in response to emergencies including child abuse and neglect.
  • Describe the science of nutrition and its impact on children's mental health.
  • Prepare feeding and menu planning for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and school-age children.
  • Set up healthful practices and food safety steps.

Credit Hours: 3

E09 - Home, School, and Community  

This course is an introduction to the partnerships between the child, family, and community that must be created in order to achieve the best results for children in the classroom and society. Among the topics covered are the challenges to creating partnerships with families, relationship-building with the parents and children, and the community's role in socializing the child.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the multiple influences on development and learning.
  • Evaluate how to support and engage families and community through respectful relationships.
  • Assess the factors that contribute to children's initiative.
  • Summarize the importance of recognizing culture and working with parents from diverse backgrounds.
  • Discuss how to best support children to understand their feelings and how to problem solve.
  • Describe influences on gender equity and child-rearing.
  • Discuss how to support families and children dealing with stress and success.
  • Explain ways to help families access community resources and expand their social networks.

Credit Hours: 3

E13 - Early Childhood Literacy  

Language Arts in the early education classroom covers a variety of topics. The development of a child's listening, speaking, writing, and reading skills is discussed in this course, as well as practical guidelines for setting up a classroom to address all children and meet their developmental needs.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the progression of language development and ways to foster that development.
  • Explain speech development in young children and identify ways to address the needs of multicultural students.
  • Plan and promote language, literacy, and listening.
  • Identify how to effectively use literature and storytelling in the classroom.
  • Discuss the value of using poetry, flannel boards, puppetry, and drama to foster language arts experiences.
  • Describe the progression of speech in children and how to successfully incorporate group times in the classroom.
  • Explain the stages children follow as beginning writers and readers and the many approaches to foster these stages.
  • Discuss how to set up a literacy-rich classroom and work cooperatively with parents.

Credit Hours: 3

Finance

F01 - Money and Banking  

This is a study of monetary economics with an international slant. It includes complete coverage of the financial system, behavior of interest rates, financial institution management, the banking industry and its regulation, central banking and the conduct of monetary policy, international finance, and monetary theory.
Credit Hours: 3

F02 - Financial Institutions and Markets  

This course provides a detailed look at the various types of organizations that make up the financial industry and the markets within which these organizations operate. Topics include Federal Reserve monetary policy, bonds and interest rate risk, commercial banking, international banking, thrift institutions, finance companies, insurance companies, pension funds, investment banking, and venture capital. Money, mortgage, equity, derivatives, and international markets are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3

F03 - Financial Statement Analysis  

This course presents the art of analyzing financial statements and the accompanying notes, to identify the financial health of a business enterprise. The four financial statements required by generally accepted accounting principles are thoroughly analyzed and the techniques of detecting financial statement fraud are introduced.
Credit Hours: 3

F04 - Investments  

This course provides in-depth coverage of investment alternatives, securities markets, risk/return tradeoffs, portfolio theory and selection, asset pricing models, common stock valuation and analysis, economy/market analysis, sector/industry analysis, technical analysis, bond yields and prices, options, futures, portfolio management, and evaluation of investment performance.
Credit Hours: 3

Healthcare

H01 - Medical Office Management I  

This course provides an overview of medical office topics, including typical happenings in a medical office, an introduction to medical terminology, insurance processing and coding, safety issues, communications issues, interacting with patients, and records management.
Credit Hours: 3

H02 - Medical Office Management II  

This course is a continuation of Medical Office Management I, providing a look at the disease process, physical examination, laboratory procedures, diagnostic equipment, nutrition, medications, specialty practices, physical therapy, and responding to medical emergencies.
Credit Hours: 3

H03 - Medical Terminology  

This course will familiarize students with medical terminology and the structure of the human body. Lessons are organized based on the systems of the human body including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive, respiratory, nervous, reproductive, cardiovascular, blood and lymphatic systems. Oncology, radiology, and nuclear medicine are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3

H04 - Anatomy and Physiology I  

The anatomy and physiology of the human body is presented as an integrated science. Each major body system is described and analyzed to illustrate normal function as well as pathology. Topics include basic biochemical elements, skin, bone, muscles, the nervous system, the senses, and the endocrine system.
Credit Hours: 3

H05 - Anatomy and Physiology II  

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Topics include the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, immunity and infection control, respiration, digestion, nutrition, the urinary system, reproduction, and genetics.
Credit Hours: 3

H06 - Health Records Management  

This course introduces most of the records used in a medical office. Students will see examples of these records, study their contents, and learn how these records are used, shared, and stored by the medical office. Students will also learn about the relationships among these records and medical care, legal, and insurance or billing concerns.
Credit Hours: 3

H07 - Medical Coding I  

This course presents an introduction to the claim forms and billing concepts that depend upon the proper coding of each diagnosis and medical procedure. Topics will include descriptions of the most common insurance plans and health care programs, such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare, and Workers’ Compensation. HCPCS and CMS reimbursement issues will also be discussed.
Credit Hours: 3

H08 - Medical Coding II  

This course is all about understanding the language and culture of the medical community. You will learn about the codes and terminology that are spoken in the medical community, the various billing and collection techniques, the reimbursement and appeals process, and the future of medicine: compliance.
Credit Hours: 3

Human Resources

M01 - Human Resource Management  

The principles and human relations problems involved in the administration of personnel are thoroughly explored. Topics include job analysis and specification, recruitment, selection and training, job evaluation, supervision of employees, salary and wage administration, and labor relations. The students will gain familiarity with modern methods of selection, testing, training, and solving various personnel problems.
Credit Hours: 3

R01 - Employment Law  

This course surveys the key issues in employment law, describing the relationship between employers and employees, describing the scope of laws protecting employees from unlawful discrimination on the job, and introducing other employment matters such as workers’ compensation and union agreements.
Credit Hours: 3

R02 - Training and Development  

In this course, students will learn why training and development are important to the success of an enterprise and how training and development are successfully carried out in an enterprise. Topics covered include employee development and strategic training, needs assessment, learning theories, transfer of training, training evaluation, and the use of technology in training.
Credit Hours: 3

R03 - Compensation and Benefits  

This course examines how compensation practices may be an advantage or disadvantage for enterprises in competitive environments, the criteria used to evaluate employees’ compensation and benefits, and the challenges faced by human resource professionals in designing compensation and benefits practices in the future.
Credit Hours: 3

R04 - Human Relations  

R04, Human Relations, is an examination of the four major issues in human relations: understanding and managing one's self, dealing effectively with others, fostering career success, and managing one's personal life. These issues are presented within the premise that career and personal success are interrelated.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain strategies to improve interpersonal skills, self-esteem, and self-confidence.
  • Describe how diversity and cultural differences impact the workplace.
  • Explain the communication process as it relates to personal and digital interactions.
  • Describe team interactions in terms of roles, communications, and problem-solving.
  • Explain the skills, behaviors, and techniques used to lead and motivate others.
  • Explain the role of political skills, customer satisfaction, and ethics in business organizations.
  • Explain the contributing factors and methods for managing stress.
  • Describe effective methods for finding a job and managing your career.

Credit Hours: 3

Marketing

G01 - Consumer Buying Behavior  

This course is an introduction to the world of consumer behavior, investigating how perceptions, learning, memory, personality, and attitudes all influence purchase decisions and buying behavior. Group dynamics and the influence of culture and subculture on consumer consumption preferences will also be addressed.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Define consumer behavior, explain market segmentation, and explain how technology and culture create a new "always on" consumer.
  • Define and describe the stages in the consumer decision-making process, the categories of consumer decision-making, and the situational effects and emotions that influence consumer behavior.
  • Detail why marketers have an obligation to provide safe and functional products as part of their business activities and how consumer behavior impacts directly on major public policy issues confronting society.
  • Identify perception and the self and describe how they influence purchasing decisions.
  • Explain the power of attitudes and how marketers use consumer attitudes to predict customer behavior.
  • Describe the various forms of reference group influence and the family life cycle on household decision-making.
  • Define the characteristics of and explain the differences between social classes in America, including how social class affects purchase decisions.
  • Outline how new products, services, and ideas spread through a population over time and different types of people who are more or less likely to adopt them during this diffusion process.

Credit Hours: 3

G02 - Principles of Professional Selling  

This course is an introduction to the world of personal selling. We will take a close look at developing customer relationship strategies and product strategies. Strategies for sales presentations, closing the sale, and servicing the sale will also be explored. Finally, we will take a closer look at the many facets of sales management.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss personal selling as an extension of the marketing concept.
  • Describe the evolution of consultative selling from the marketing era to the present.
  • Define the concepts and characteristics of presentation strategy and consultative sales presentations.
  • Describe the characteristics of the major selling strategies: relationship, product, and customer.
  • Outline the importance of developing a prospect base, sources of prospects, and common methods of organizing prospect information.
  • Describe the evolution of partnering and how it relates to the quality improvement process.
  • Discuss how self-image forms the foundation for building long-term selling relationships.
  • Identify the merits of the four major sources of sales training.

Credit Hours: 3

G03 - Principles of Retailing  

Principles of Retailing, G03, reviews management of a retail business, with extensive coverage of the types of retailers, marketing and financial strategies, retail locations, human resource management, supply chain management, merchandise management, and store management.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the complexities of retailers' relationships — with both customers and other channel members.
  • Outline organizational missions, ownership and management alternatives, goods/service categories, and objectives of a broad range of retail institutions.
  • Describe the many influences on retail shoppers, including lifestyles, needs, and shopping attitudes.
  • Explain the crucial nature of store location for retailers and outline the steps in location planning.
  • Identify the structural, financial, and operational dimensions of operations management in enacting a retail strategy.
  • Discuss the merchandise management and pricing aspects of the retail strategy mix, including buying, handling, forecasting, and budgeting.
  • Describe elements involved in how a retailer communicates with its customers, the role of a retail image, and how it is developed and sustained.
  • Connect the elements of a retail strategy, including planning and opportunity analysis, productivity, performance measures, and scenario analysis.

Credit Hours: 3

G04 - Integrated Marketing Communications  

This course covers the principles of marketing. Topics covered include assessing, analyzing, understanding, and targeting the marketplace, as well as the creation, capture, delivery, and communication of value. Students will learn how to develop a marketing plan, use social and mobile marketing effectively, integrate ethics into marketing strategies, influence the consumer decision process, perform market research, perform SWOT and STP analyses, make decisions concerning branding, packaging, and developing new products, price products and services fairly, set advertising objectives, and more.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal communication skills.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Demonstrate computer and information literacy.
  • Analyze marketing plans, strategies and the aids needed to catalyze it.
  • Analyze the foundation of the marketing model and its emergence.
  • Point out the targeted strategies and plans in marketing and globalization.
  • Formulate a plan of valuing production, innovation, and product marketing.
  • Develop the valuing strategies for products and services in marketing.
  • Categorize the strategies for supply chain management and retailing.
  • Distinguish between the various domains under IMC strategies.
  • Design a marketing plan for an existing business.

Credit Hours: 3

Paralegal Studies

P01 - Introduction to Paralegalism I  

This survey course provides an introduction to the paralegal profession. Career opportunities will be examined, as well as the training and educational requirements demanded of the paralegal. Civil litigation and criminal law will be explored. The entire trial process — from filing a complaint to the appeals process — will be studied in depth. The history of American laws and the structure of the U.S. court system are also highlights of this course.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the roles and duties of the paralegal.
  • Distinguish between the rules of ethics that govern attorneys and those that govern paralegals.
  • Explain how law firms are structured O Discuss the role technology plays in a law office.
  • Outline the history, sources, and functions of U.S. law.
  • Describe the federal and state court systems.
  • List the steps in a trial.
  • Discuss the protections afforded by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Credit Hours: 3

P02 - Introduction to Paralegalism II  

The paralegal's role in investigation and interviews highlights the beginning of the course. Legal research and writing will be examined throughout. Then this survey course moves into specific legal subjects. Torts; property law, including intellectual property (IP); contracts and e-commerce, family law; and labor law will be explored in depth.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the importance of the initial contact with clients and witnesses.
  • Explain the process of identifying legal issues, material facts, applicable law, and reaching a conclusion after applying the law to the facts.
  • Describe the types of damages available to plaintiffs in tort and product liability lawsuits.
  • Discuss the elements of a contract.
  • Distinguish between real and personal property O Explain how courts determine child custody and support issues.
  • Discuss the scope of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and major legislation that impacted workers' rights.
  • Discuss the protections afforded to intellectual property (IP).

Credit Hours: 3

P03 - Torts  

This course explores tort law. Negligence, intentional torts, and strict liability torts will be examined, as well as the affirmative defenses defendants can raise. Premises liability and business-related torts will also be covered. The common law history of tort law and modern remedies for resolving such disputes will be examined as well. The entire trial process — from filing a complaint to the appeals process — will be studied in depth.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • List the elements of tort.
  • Explain how a lawsuit gets started and the rules that govern its progression.
  • Discuss the concept of duty of care and how it can be breached.
  • List the elements of the intentional torts of assault, battery, false imprisonment, intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of a right to privacy, defamation, conversion, trespass to land, and trespass to chattels.
  • Outline the elements of negligent misrepresentation and fraud.
  • Explain the defenses of necessity, consent, and mistake.
  • Explain the concept of strict liability O Describe the concept of vicarious liability and how it comes into play.

Credit Hours: 3

P05 - Criminal Law and Procedures  

This course takes a close look at the U.S. criminal justice system. The steps involved in a criminal prosecution are covered from start to finish, including appeals. Types of crimes and the elements required to commit crime are explored as well. This course also examines the U.S. Constitution and the rights afforded to criminal defendants. The paralegal's role as assistant to either the prosecutor or criminal defense attorney is highlighted throughout the course.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe various categories of crime and their respective elements.
  • Define various degrees of murder.
  • Discuss kidnapping and human trafficking issues.
  • Explain why some crimes are classified as social crimes.
  • Explain why treason, sedition, and espionage are such serious offenses.
  • Discuss the Common Law defenses of self-defense, necessity, duress, entrapment, mistake of fact, mistake of law, and consent of the victim.
  • Discuss the U.S. Constitutional provisions of the Fourth Amendment that protect citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures.
  • List the steps in a criminal trial.

Credit Hours: 3

P07 - Law Office Management  

This course provides insight into the practical side of operating a law office. The roles and duties of the legal team are explained. Later lessons discuss the unauthorized practice of law, calendaring, docket control, and case management. The role ethics plays is examined throughout. The course concludes with a discussion of marketing and the legal library.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the duties and titles of each member of the legal team.
  • Identify the functions of legal administration.
  • Discuss ethical codes that apply to paralegals and attorneys.
  • Discuss factors that will promote successful client relationships.
  • Differentiate between timekeeping and billing.
  • Explain why paralegals need a rudimentary understanding of law office accounting.
  • Discuss how to calculate court deadlines and schedule important meetings.
  • Identify cost saving practices for legal libraries.

Credit Hours: 3

P09 - Legal Research and Writing  

This course provides insight into legal research and writing. The basics of researching case law, statutory law, and administrative regulations are explained. Students will learn how to read cases and statutes, distinguish between primary and secondary sources of law, and apply these skills to brief a case. Later lessons delve into the basic rules of writing and the unique rules that apply to legal writing. The course concludes with a discussion of proofreading, editing, and cite checking.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe what legal research is and its importance.
  • Explain how to read the language contained in a statute.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in briefing a case.
  • Explain how to locate cases and federal regulations in print and online.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in legal research and analysis.
  • Summarize how to construct effective sentences, paragraphs, and transitions.
  • Explain the purpose and intended audience of a legal research memorandum.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in proofreading, editing, and cite checking a legal document in print and online.

Credit Hours: 3

Psychology

S01 - Introduction to Psychology I  

This course explores introductory concepts in psychology. This course helps students to think like psychologists and understand why scientific and critical thinking is so important to the decisions they make in their own lives. This course provides an overview of psychology that emphasizes critical thinking, gender, and culture.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Define the science of psychology.
  • Explain the purpose of conducting research within psychology and identify key concepts of ethical research in psychology.
  • Explain how genes, chromosomes, DNA, and genomes all relate to one another and their importance to psychology.
  • Identify and describe the major structures of the central nervous system and their primary functions.
  • Define circadian rhythms and explain how the body's "biological clock" works and what happens when it doesn't.
  • Distinguish between the basic processes of sensation and perception, explain how the doctrine of specific nerve energies applies to perception, and discuss how synesthesia contributes to our understanding of sensory modalities.
  • Describe the basic principles of classical conditioning, including the extinction and recovery of a classically conditioned response, how higher-order conditioning takes place, and the process of stimulus generalization and discrimination.
  • Compare social norms and social roles, and note how each contributes to the social rules that govern a culture.

Credit Hours: 3

S02 - Introduction to Psychology II  

This course builds on what you've learned in Introduction to Psychology I (S01). That foundation included topics such as defining psychology, exploring the brain and nervous system, becoming familiar with sensation and perception, learning and conditioning, and the ways by which behavior is shaped by social and cultural influences. In this course, Introduction to Psychology II (S02), we'll press onward to gain insights into an array of topics that include thinking and intelligence, memory, motivation, theories of personality, emotions and stress management, development over the lifespan, an overview of psychological disorders and, finally, an exploration of treatments and therapies for addressing the various kinds of psychological disorders.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the rational and irrational processes involved in thinking and describe approaches to the measurement of intelligence.
  • Discuss and explain the nature of memory, including the ways we reconstruct the past, the three-box model, and techniques for enhancing memory.
  • Describe the nature of emotions and the various influences of emotion on our health and well-being, including guidelines for managing stress.
  • Discuss and explain variables related to motivation, including weight management, love vs. infatuation, the biological root of sexuality, the cultural influences of gender bias, and our drive to achieve personal goals.
  • Outline and discuss human development over the lifespan, including infancy, early childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age, and an understanding of the stages of cognitive and moral development.
  • Discuss and explain theories of personality, including psychodynamic models originating with the work of Sigmund Freud and modern personality theories based on identifying personality traits, while appraising genetic, peer, family, and cultural influences on personality development.
  • Outline and discuss the various forms of mental disorders.
  • Outline and discuss the various approaches to treating or alleviating the different kinds of mental disorders.

Credit Hours: 3

S03 - Human Growth and Development I  

This course provides an exciting and comprehensive overview on human development. It highlights lifespan development and its fascinating theories and applications. This course enriches the student's understanding of lifespan development and demonstrates how this can be applied to the student's own life. Finally, this course highlights how the student can develop a sense of awareness of the similarities of growth and developmental changes everyone shares.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize the relationship of lifespan development, heredity, and genetic influences along with their prenatal impact.
  • Describe the labor and birth processes, potential birth complications, and the competent newborn.
  • Explain the infant's growth and development in relation to motor, sensory, cognitive, information processing, and language development.
  • Discuss the infant's cognitive growth as it relates to information processing and language development.
  • Compare the evolution of the infant's social and personality formation and a child's physical and intellectual changes in beginning childhood.
  • Describe the intricacies of a preschooler's psychosocial, social, and moral development.
  • List the physical, intellectual, and educational developments of a child in middle school.
  • Explain the adolescent's physical and cognitive development and potential threats to this population.

Credit Hours: 3

S04 - Human Growth and Development II  

This course offers fascinating insight into human growth and development from middle childhood to late adulthood. Students will build on the knowledge they attained in the first part of this course, which looked at lifespan from infancy to middle childhood. New discoveries that continue to draw scientific and personal attention about the ongoing nature-nurture debate and its impact on human development will be discussed. Students will also delve into the interesting topic of the human condition and reflect on how their own lives will evolve.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Compare social and personality development of middle childhood with early adulthood.
  • Describe relationships in the life of the adolescent.
  • Explain the intellectual and physical development of adults and how experiences impact this group.
  • Summarize the various changes that occur during middle adulthood.
  • Discuss social, personality, and balance changes that affect middle adulthood.
  • State the physical, cognitive, and health changes in late adulthood.
  • Explain the intrinsic and extrinsic variables that affect late adulthood.
  • Describe the effects of death and dying, along with grief and bereavement, on late adulthood.

Credit Hours: 3

S06 - Social Psychology 

In this course, students are introduced to concepts related to the behavior of individuals as members of the larger society as expressed in varying beliefs, norms, attitudes and attitude changes, along with basic ideas and concepts related to group influence and persuasion. Proceeding from this basic foundation, students will explore the nature of group dynamics, cultural influences, conformity, attraction and intimacy, aggression and its sources, prejudice and its effects and sources, as well as the opposition of altruism and conflict in social life.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the field of social psychology, including the methods that social psychologists typically use in research.
  • Explain how the self-concept is developed across time.
  • Discuss human behavior in terms of social cognition, social perception, and attitudes.
  • Describe how social roles affect conformity and compliance.
  • Illustrate how other individuals and groups influence an individual's behavior.
  • Express how stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and aggression are formed, and how they influence human behavior.
  • Describe the factors that influence attraction and the nature of relationships.
  • Discuss the concept of prosocial behavior.

Credit Hours: 3

S07 - Abnormal Psychology  

Completing this course will not turn you into a trained clinician, nor will you suddenly become a trained researcher puzzling over statistical or experimental data. Nevertheless, you'll have a pretty good understanding of the role of clinicians as they assess, diagnose, and attempt to treat a wide variety of psychological disorders. You'll also have some understanding of how researchers conduct scientific studies to try to shed light on the mysteries of the human mind.

Among many other topics, you'll become familiar with the distinctions between normal and abnormal behavior. From that starting point, you'll be able to outline the history of the discipline from the ancient philosophers to today's cutting-edge diagnostic tools that scan the brain. You'll be able to discuss specific anxiety disorders, including PTSD; describe obsessive-compulsive disorders; and explain somatic dissociative disorders. You will also be able to describe bipolar and depressive disorders, and feeding and eating disorders. Moving on, you'll be able to define and explain gender dysphoria, sexual dysfunctions, paraphilic disorders, and substance-related and addictive disorders. Near the end of this course, you'll be able to explain the schizophrenia spectrum and its relationship to other psychotic disorders. Whew! Just for fun, scan what you've just read. Count the number of terms you can't define. Are you feeling challenged? Good. Just keep in mind that you can meet these challenges. And you may even gain some insights into the twists and turns of your own mysterious mind.

Bon voyage!

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe differences between normal and abnormal behavior, the history of treatments, research methods, and various perspectives.
  • Discuss the goals of assessing, diagnosing, and treating abnormal psychological disorders.
  • Describe the nature and symptoms of impulse control disorders, somatic disorders, and dissociative disorders.
  • Discuss bipolar disorders, depressive disorders, eating disorders, and the epidemiological factors that may affect them.
  • Discuss the characteristics of and treatments for sexual dysfunctions and substance-related disorders.
  • Describe psychotic disorders and personality disorder clusters and the etiological factors related to them.
  • Describe the etiology of intellectual deficiency, learning disorders, and disorders related to aging.
  • Explain the relationship between law, ethics, and treatment issues in abnormal psychology.

Credit Hours: 3

S08 - Psychology of Personality  

This course enables students to understand the basics of personality psychology. Students will differentiate among several theoretical perspectives of personality psychology, such as psychoanalysis, cognitive-behavioral, and motivation theories. Emphasis is placed on the importance of learners recognizing principle systems and underlying beliefs innate in various personality paradigms that accurately reflect their own personal perspectives. Additionally, students will learn to recognize strategies and approaches in psychology that reflect identified personality theories as a foundation and how to apply concepts to events in day-to-day life.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain foundational concepts of personality psychology.
  • Explain personality traits and how concept relates to identifying an individual's personality.
  • Discuss physiological approaches used in personality research, including how physiological measurements are made.
  • Explain and discuss intrapsychic of personality, including psychoanalysis and psychodynamic theory.
  • Describe cognitive foundations of personality psychology.
  • Discuss how influence plays a role in personality and how individuals are able to influence the behavior of others.
  • Explain the concept of resilience and how this concept directly relates to an individual's ability to adjust to various situations.
  • Apply psychological principles relating to personality psychology theories to understanding special topics.

Credit Hours: 3

Retail

L01 - Introduction to Retailing  

This is an introduction to retailing concepts and processes. The student will explore the basics of retailing, such as setting up a retail business, primary target markets, products, and location. In addition, the student will survey personnel and risk management, and examine the basics of writing a business plan and operating a retail business in the global marketplace.
Credit Hours: 3

L02 - Retail Supply Chain Management  

This is an introduction to the basics of supply chain management. The student will explore the distribution channel including the types of channels and the relationships among channel members. They will also examine the supply chain operations of planning, sourcing materials, making products, deliveries, and returns. The use of technology to operate the supply chain will be discussed, and supply chain metrics will be presented.
Credit Hours: 3

L03 - Retail Buying  

This course explores important concepts of retail buying, beginning with a discussion of customer needs, support staff requirements, and the education and training buyers need. The course also explores the roles of buying groups, merchandise assortments, planning and controls, and how technology and Internet commerce relates to retailing. In addition, the student will learn how to choose vendors, translate plans into purchases, negotiate the buy, and price and sell merchandise once it has been bought.
Credit Hours: 3

L04 - Retail Employee Management  

This course examines the various aspects of hiring, managing, motivating, and retaining retail employees. The course describes hiring techniques and discusses federal employment laws. The student will also explore concepts such as the effective management of employees, employee benefits, retention, and motivation, and customer service and relationship building.
Credit Hours: 3

Security

T01 - Introduction to Security Management  

This is a broad overview of the field of security management, including homeland security, loss prevention, risk analysis, physical security of property and personnel, fire protection, insurance, theft, workplace violence, drug use, terrorism, and computer security.
Credit Hours: 3

T03 - Incident Command Systems  

This course examines management of response operations for mass casualty and high impact incidents, including EMS (Emergency Medical Services) operations, functions, and logistics, communications management, community threat assessment, and significant coverage of EMS response in the real world.
Credit Hours: 3

T05 - Criminal Behavior  

This is a foundational course in criminology, the study of the criminal mind. Topics include coverage of crime patterns, crime causation (biological, psychological, and sociological), crimes against persons and property, white collar crime, drug trafficking, and high tech crime.
Credit Hours: 3

T07 - Homeland Security and Public Safety  

This is a capstone course in security management, providing a broad overview of the coordination of private security with local police, fire, and EMS personnel, in addition to coordination with federal government agencies, particularly the Office of Homeland Security. The course also provides a detailed look at emergency response to incidents involving weapons of mass destruction.
Credit Hours: 3

 

Electives (300-400 Level)

Listed by discipline – students can choose any course from any discipline, unless the course is already part of the required curriculum.

Business

BM350 - Marketing Management  

Marketing Management, BM350, reviews the bedrock principles and theories of marketing, including strategic planning, marketing research, the marketing mix, building brands, and communicating value. Specialized fields such as service marketing and business marketing are presented.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Present the essentials of marketing and marketing management theories, concepts, and models.
  • Identify and discuss the tools and methodologies used to solve marketing management problems.
  • Compare and contrast the processes that influence buying behavior in business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets.
  • Explain the concept of branding, key ingredients of brand equity, and the strategic brand management process.
  • Examine the role competition plays in expanding and defending market share.
  • Discuss the classifications of products, elements of product design, and how to manage a product mix and product lines.
  • Analyze pricing and demonstrate the psychology of pricing of products and services.
  • Describe the elements of the promotional mix and determine which are the most favorable for certain products and services.

Credit Hours: 3

BM440 - Internet Marketing  

This course presents a framework to help students and practitioners understand how to think about and implement effective Internet marketing programs. The course also provides an overview of electronic marketing tools and how these tools can be integrated into the marketing process.
Credit Hours: 3

BU330 - Accounting for Managers  

Welcome to the world of Accounting for Managers! It's a practical world of analysis interpretation and problem solving. You'll have to work through transactions, complete calculations and financial statements, and analyze and interpret your results to answer the questions. You'll also need to keep your eye on the goal of sound decision making. Understanding how to apply what you learn in this Accounting for Managers course to everyday business situations can help make you a more effective decision maker. May your judgment be sound and your choices lead you to success.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrate job-specific technical and professional skills.
  • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Analyze the various concepts related to managerial accounting and cost accounting.
  • Explain the different tools of management used for the decision-making process.
  • Identify the various budget analysis processes and the performance measurements for decision making.
  • Analyze the various components of capital budgeting, cash flow statements, and ratio analysis.
  • Solve examples of real-world accounting problems using knowledge of accounting forms and equations.

Credit Hours: 3

BU340 - Managerial Finance I  

Financial management integrates concepts from economics, accounting, management, and other business disciplines to forge a sound basis on which the firm can predict risk, return, and cash flows for operating and strategic decisions. This enables financial managers to manage the firm's resources and maximize return to the firm's shareholders, a central goal of most corporations. Topics include financial management, the time value of money, interest, stocks, and bonds.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the effects of financial planning on strategy.
  • Measure risk and calculate the risk-adjusted discount rate.
  • Calculate the value of money at different points in time.
  • Evaluate bonds and calculate bond yields.
  • Determine the price of common and preferred stock.
  • Assess investments using net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return methods.
  • Compute a firm's cash flow components.
  • Explain how financial institutions determine discount and investment rates.

Credit Hours: 3

BU350 - Organizational Behavior  

Focusing on the people in the organization and how they work and behave, this course examines the behavior of individuals, the dynamics of teamwork, the processes of small groups, decision-making, problem solving, and conflict management. The course also discusses how to motivate people and improve employee performance, provide feedback, and use rewards and positive reinforcement.
Credit Hours: 3

BU360 - Business and Society  

This course examines broad social, ethical, and technological trends that affect business operations, exploring some of the effects and implications of business-society interactions related to public issues, ethics and social responsibility, the environment, culture and diversity, and the process of globalization.
Credit Hours: 3

BU440 - Managerial Finance II  

This course explores the concepts, techniques, and tools used for financial decision making at strategic, tactical, and operational levels of a firm including capital structure planning, financing decisions, working capital management, and financial management for multinational corporations.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: BU340

BU450 - Leadership Skills  

Providing a basic foundation to equip students for future leadership activities in business, government, and society, this course explores the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. It also demonstrates skills needed to promote change, communicate vision, provide a sense of direction, and inspire employees.
Credit Hours: 3

BU460 - Electronic Commerce  

This course introduces the managerial applications of Internet technology for a successful Web-based organization. The course examines the application of management principles to electronic business models, including business-to-consumer, business-to-business, and intra-business commercial ventures. It also presents the strategic application of EC principles to the process of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational processes, adding value to current business practices, and driving the development of new value-added activities.
Credit Hours: 3

BU470 - Strategic Management  

Strategic management may sound uninteresting on the surface, but as you'll see in this course, there are many interesting aspects to strategic management and knowing how a firm can have a competitive advantage in the marketplace! BU470 is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, models, and theories of strategic management by looking at case analyses, analyzing external environments, evaluating internal capabilities, and exploring useful strategies. The emphasis of the course is on the successful implementation of strategies in different types of firms across industries to gain an advantage over all their competitors.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Define strategy and the strategic management process.
  • Describe external environment and how it affects the decisions and performance of a firm.
  • Describe how a firm analyzes its internal capabilities and why it is essential to an organization.
  • Explain cost leadership and the benefits of the cost leadership strategy.
  • Define product differentiation and explain how it can create economic value.
  • Discuss the strategies of flexibility and real options and how they benefit a firm.
  • Summarize explicit and tacit collusion and the issues associated with the decision to collude.

Credit Hours: 3

BU480 - eBusiness Strategy  

E-Business Strategy addresses the new technological environment that businesses are facing by exploring strategic considerations related to technology and technology implementation. The course also examines the basics of the marketing exchange by utilizing social media, database marketing, interactive telecommunications, and other e-business techniques.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Assess how the new technological environment will impact business activity.
  • Describe the strategic planning process and the external environment within which an organization operates.
  • Describe the virtual value chain and how companies move from managing an internal value chain to operating along a value network.
  • Explain the impact of the Internet on business goals and activities.
  • Explain how the value-process framework integrates the value chain and the five forces analyses, including the relationship between strategy formulation and the concepts of value creation and value capturing.
  • Compare and contrast the various organizational structures for e-business activities.
  • Describe how to implement and utilize digital customer relationship management (CRM) and mobile e-commerce.
  • Explain the e-business strategy formulation roadmap and how to link the steps of the roadmap to the different parts of the e-business strategy framework.

Credit Hours: 3

BU490 - Business Ethics  

This course examines ethics and values in business, investigating the moral responsibilities within the organization, reviewing several approaches to examining ethical issues, and examining justice from the perspectives of procedures, compensation, and retribution. The role of moral leadership in business and an examination of ethical dilemmas created by an expanding global economy are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3

BZ380 - Management Information Systems  

BZ380 focuses on understanding information systems that today's managers use to make decisions and analyze production and performance in a business environment. The student will be able to identify the challenges facing firms today, understand the technologies that will help them meet these challenges, design business processes to take advantage of the technologies, and describe management procedures and policies to implement the required changes. The student will also be able to understand what the role of information systems is concerning project and global management.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize information systems and the global business environment.
  • Relate how organizations use information systems in a strategic manner.
  • Synthesize information technology and the management of data.
  • Explain how telecommunication networks operate and employ security.
  • Categorize and relate the use and applications of enterprise systems and e-commerce.
  • Relate how managing knowledge in business with work systems and business intelligence assists managerial decisions.
  • Summarize project and systems development management as each relates to goals and risks.
  • Synthesize global management and internationalization of information systems.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ400 - Strategic Information Technology  

This course will improve your decision making about technology. You will learn to identify major technologies that can increase competitive advantage. You will learn how to avoid some of the implementation traps that can lead to failed projects with careful planning. After completing this course, you will be able to diagnose choice technologies, organize your thinking about technology in helpful ways, and then analyze them in ways to help make technology a valuable strategic differentiator. You will learn how laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley are forcing organizations to align business processes with technology.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize how information systems have evolved utilizing various strategies.
  • Synthesize management of information system infrastructure and electronic commerce.
  • Relate the use of social media in the business environment for communication.
  • Support the use of business intelligence, its components, and its integration with databases.
  • Describe core business processes and implementation of enterprise resource planning systems.
  • Evaluate the impact of supply chain management and customer relationship management on organizations.
  • Explain how companies invest in technology and the processes used in securing technology.
  • Appraise how information security is threatened, controlled, and managed.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ420 - Human Resources Management  

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of human resources management. The course begins with an overview and legal aspects. Work analysis and workforce planning, recruiting, staffing, training, and performance management are also evaluated. This foundation is used to synthesize how the human resources professional manages careers, compensation, labor relations, safety and health of employees, and discipline and procedural justice. The course concludes by evaluating related concepts in a global context.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Evaluate a strategic HR plan for an organization and the role of the HR manager.
  • Interpret the role played by HR in personnel planning, recruiting, and creating job requirements.
  • Design an employee training and development program that addresses key deficits in these areas.
  • Synthesize performance appraisal criteria for multiple positions in an organization.
  • Delineate the methods used to create an employee benefit and incentive plan.
  • Critically interpret employment discrimination and labor laws to deal effectively with employment issues on the job.
  • Evaluate the methods for managing legal, health, safety, and ethical issues in the workplace.
  • Assess the need for global HR expansion, including a hiring strategy that best suits the new business environment.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ440 - Quality Control  

This course is a study of quality management processes from teams to organization-wide systems and the behavioral and analytical tools that support fully integrated quality management. Emphasis is given to the commitment of management and the organization to make the cultural changes necessary to implement quality improvements through the organization to ensure long-term competitiveness.
Credit Hours: 3

BZ450 - Being an Entrepreneur  

This course provides a strong foundation in the theory, process, and practice of entrepreneurship. The course also presents detailed information on marketing research for new ventures, how to outline and present an effective business plan, characteristics of a sole proprietorship, partnership, and a corporation, as well as patent protection, copyrights and trademarks.
Credit Hours: 3

BZ460 - Project Management  

In this course, the student will first learn about project management, including the project manager's responsibility to the project. Topics to be discussed include the role of the project manager in managing the project life cycle, including defining tasks, scheduling, allocating resources, monitoring, and controlling. Tools, techniques, and tips for project management will also be presented. Once this is accomplished, the student will delve into the detailed requirements of project planning.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the primary goals of project management, as well as the planning process and project life cycle.
  • Explain how projects are identified and selected, along with the proposal solicitation process.
  • Describe the project scope document, quality, how to define what activities need to be done, who will be responsible for them, and in what sequence they will be performed.
  • Discuss monitoring and controlling the progress of the project, replanning, and updating the project schedule.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the resource requirements plan, forecasting project cost at completion, controlling project costs, and managing cash flow.
  • Explain how to identify risks and their potential impact, risk response planning, and controlling risks.
  • Describe the characteristics of effective project teams and team management.
  • Explain an element vital to the effective performance of a project: communication.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ480 - International Management  

This course deals with the issues affecting multinational corporation managers in a global business environment. Its primary focus is on understanding, respecting, and working within the parameters of a variety of cultures affecting the outcomes of all dimensions of business and management operations. These dimensions include, but are not limited to, business communication and negotiation, management decision making, strategy formulation and implementation; organizational structure and control; staffing, training, and compensation for global operations; and motivation and leadership from a multinational, multicultural set of perspectives.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss reasons why managers engage in global marketplaces and their subsequent rights and ethical responsibilities.
  • Explain how managers develop cultural intelligence to facilitate international cross-cultural communication.
  • Describe how analyses and models are utilized to enter a global market.
  • Compare cultural behavior and communication complexities in international business management.
  • Interpret how strategy and alliances provide the framework for international managerial success.
  • Synthesize how strategic planning, staffing, and international human resource management present management with challenges and opportunities.
  • Appraise how international management operates among various cultures and labor relation systems.
  • Summarize how global cultures impact international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Criminal Justice

CJ320 - American Constitutional Law  

This course is designed to introduce you to the underlying political structure of the American judiciary and to explore the political and legal foundations for constitutional law in the American political system. This course is based on the premise that judges are political actors and courts are political institutions; both are integrally connected with other branches of American government, and federal and state governmental relationships are key because the system is based on the "rule of law."

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Illustrate the core principles of constitutional law as developed under the Articles of the Constitution.
  • Examine the role of the judiciary as part of the political process.
  • Summarize the role of the legislative branch of government as part of the political process.
  • Explain the role of the executive branch of government, including administrative agencies, as part of the political process.
  • Analyze contemporary federalism: the federal and state relationship.
  • Examine the Bill of Rights and the First Amendment.
  • Analyze the core principles of privacy and equal protection as developed under the Fifth Amendment.
  • Evaluate civil rights legislation and the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments to the US Constitution.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ330 - Criminal Law and Procedure  

This is a comprehensive survey of source, distinctions, and limitations relating to criminal law, the principles of criminal liability, the various crimes and their elements, and the criteria considered in determining capacity and defenses. Also explored are the elements of due process, legal liabilities of public officers, terrorism and electronic surveillance, and issues related to the Fourth Amendment.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ340 - Criminology  

Criminology is the discipline that studies crime and criminal behavior. In this course, you'll study the causes of crime, reactions, and different forms of criminal behavior. You'll also explore the many interrelationships of the criminal enterprise, the criminal justice system, and the study of the reasons for criminality.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Analyze the disciplines of criminology, victimology, and the associated research methods.
  • Point out the important theories in criminology.
  • Distinguish among violent crime, property crime, and white-collar crime.
  • Categorize the special types of crime and the future of crime.
  • Analyze theories on the emergence of law.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal arts, natural sciences, and social sciences.
  • Demonstrate job-specific technical and professional skills.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Demonstrate computer and information literacy.
  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal communication skills.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ350 - Judicial Process  

This course explores the structures of both federal and state criminal courts. The roles and duties of key players will be examined, as well as the constitutional rights of defendants. The history of juries and development of criminal law will be explored as well. The entire trial process, including pretrial procedures, plea bargains, appeals, and differential treatment of offenders will be studied in depth.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the hierarchical structure of the courts.
  • Outline the history and development of the federal courts.
  • Outline the history and development of the juvenile courts.
  • Describe the qualifications and appointments of federal judges.
  • Outline the history of criminal defense.
  • Explain plea bargaining, including its history and development.
  • Describe the jury's decision-making process and factors that influence its decisions.
  • Summarize factors that lead to differential treatment in the criminal justice system.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ380 - Probation and Parole  

Did you know that probation is the most common method used in America to deal with offenders? Or that 97% of all incarcerated persons will be released at some point? This course will sharpen your skills in the areas of probation and parole. You'll examine the history of probation and parole and discover how the mistreatment of children on farms and in factories led to the current system of probation and parole. You'll engage in discussions that focus on the balance between achieving public safety and protecting offenders' rights. Each lesson provides you the opportunity to assess current and novel approaches to the fields of probation and parole. You may decide these are the careers for you!

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain why probation is the most common sentence in the American criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the complexities of the American criminal justice system.
  • List the dispositions available to the juvenile.
  • Distinguish determinate sentencing from indeterminate sentencing.
  • Evaluate theoretical and practical models for rehabilitation in probation and parole.
  • Identify the qualifications and duties of probation and parole officers.
  • Outline the benefits of intermediate punishments.
  • Evaluate the problems associated with determining "success" and "adequate supervision."

Credit Hours: 3

CJ390 - Victimology  

This course explores the concept of victimology, its history, and evolving role in the criminal justice system. The roles and duties of victims' advocates and victims' services providers will also be examined. Victims' rights, restitution, hate crimes, intimate partner violence, abuse and sexual victimization of children, special victim populations, and victimology at the international level will be studied in depth.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the social forces that have shaped the discipline of victimology.
  • Describe the limitations of statistical reports on crime.
  • Describe the typical homicide victim.
  • Explain why the term domestic violence has been expanded to intimate partner violence.
  • Explain the injuries elder populations experience as victims of crime.
  • Discuss the unique challenges special victim populations pose for law enforcement and victims' advocates.
  • Explain the significance and history of 42 U.S.C. Section 1983.
  • Summarize the pros and cons of victim impact statements.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ400 - Ethics in the Justice System  

This is an examination of a wide range of ethical issues in policing, the practice of law, sentencing, corrections, criminal justice research, and crime control policy. Course discussion includes the utilitarian and deontological approaches to criminal justice ethics, morality of the death penalty, privatization of corrections, and the myths that influence public opinion toward crime and crime control.
Credit Hours: 3

CJ410 - Leadership in Law Enforcement  

This course takes a close look at the structures, leadership, and behaviors found in a typical police agency. Course materials devoted to human resource management and on-the-job stress include a discussion of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs). This course also examines the impact that severe budget cutbacks and a culture of violence have had on law enforcement agencies across the nation. Legal issues are highlighted throughout the course.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize the ways in which policing has evolved.
  • Assess the influence of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on intelligence and policing.
  • Outline two sources of pressure that are exerted on police departments.
  • Compare transactional and transformational styles of leadership.
  • Assess the purposes and benefits of progressive discipline.
  • Discuss the ways in which police agencies have addressed budget cutbacks.
  • Summarize the typical actions of police officers that give rise to civil lawsuits.
  • Evaluate the role of the rank and file in organizational change.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ440 - White Collar Crime  

This course is designed to introduce you to an examination of white-collar crime. This includes a review of the forms, causes and consequences, relevant social scientific theories, and the mechanics of this type of crime. How the schemes work, who perpetrates them, and the relationship to the environment in which they're perpetrated are also reviewed. This includes a closer look at consumer fraud, unsafe products, environmental crime, and institutional corruption, including religious-affinity fraud, securities fraud, corporate fraud, fiduciary fraud, crimes by the government, corruption, healthcare fraud, and computer-related crime.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the meaning, measurement, costs, categories, and evolution of white-collar crime.
  • Explain crimes against consumers and crimes involving unsafe products.
  • Describe environmental crime and institutional corruption.
  • Explain securities fraud, corporate fraud, and fiduciary fraud.
  • Describe crimes by the government and corruption of public officials.
  • Describe the extent of healthcare fraud, its effect on government programs, and its costs.
  • Describe computer-related crime including its origins and its costs.
  • Explain the causes and responses to white-collar crime.

Credit Hours: 3

CJ450 - Private Security  

This is an examination of private security from a historical and philosophical perspective. Topics include the evolution of private security, basic security goals and responsibilities, investigation, deterrence theory, loss prevention through risk management, how to recruit, select, and train security personnel for an organization, and current challenges facing the security profession.
Credit Hours: 3

Early Childhood Education

EC360 - Movement and Music  

Young children explore the world around them and learn about themselves essentially by moving about and using their senses. Movement is a key component of all children's development. Thus, movement is an essential part of an early childhood curriculum. Children also love music, and rhythm is directly related to movement, making it an essential part of an early childhood curriculum as well. This is a broad-based course in physical education for children, which emphasizes the development of fundamental motor skills through child-centered activities that often involve the use of music.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain the importance of movement and music for young children.
  • Formulate a well-rounded movement and music curriculum based on state standards.
  • Examine research-based strategies for teaching music.
  • Create developmentally appropriate lessons and environments for a range of children.
  • Explain the relationship between music, movement, and higher-level thinking skills.
  • Summarize the sequence of development of gross motor skills.
  • Relate the importance of using movement and music to enhance learning.
  • Summarize how to utilize competency and performance-based assessments and evaluations.

Credit Hours: 3

EC380 - Art and Creative Development  

In a world where academic and professional achievement is so valued, it appears as though seemingly trivial activities like painting and dancing are pushed to the bottom of the priority list. However, many would argue that those tasks are actually the most important work children might do, especially in terms of their emotional, social, and cognitive development. Throughout this course, you'll explore these ideas of art, music, and movement and their roles within a child's development. By tailoring teaching strategies, assessment techniques, and environments to the creative needs of students, you'll reach one of the most important goals of teaching: to make learning fun.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrate job-specific technical and professional skills.
  • Demonstrate computer and information literacy.
  • Analyze developmental theories related to creative thinking, behavior, and play in children's learning.
  • Identify the best practices for fostering creative thinking through art, music, movement, and drama.
  • Categorize the research-based methods for assessing children's creative thinking.
  • Analyze the learning environments and materials that promote creative thinking.
  • Prepare a lesson plan for a single day for a preschool classroom.

Credit Hours: 3

EC390 - Children's Literature  

Literature is a core component of an early childhood curriculum. This course will teach students how to select and evaluate appropriate resources and how to use these resources in a classroom to meet specific educational objectives.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Apply your understanding of literary elements to evaluate the quality of children's fiction and nonfiction books.
  • Explain how teachers should choose a story to read aloud to help children develop understanding and meaning from literature.
  • Summarize knowledge of diversity in literature to create appropriate classroom activities.
  • Create and plan literature programs for emergent readers.
  • Discuss how to select poems and how children learn from poetry.
  • Identify the significance of informational books in the classroom.
  • Outline how books of various genres are evaluated and selected.
  • Describe the role of story and literature in the personal and academic lives of children.

Credit Hours: 3

EC400 - Early Childhood Math & Science  

This course focuses on incorporating the fundamental concepts of math and science into education programs for young children. It provides strategies for teaching children how to apply these concepts in problem-solving and scientific investigation.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize the concepts children are developing in early childhood.
  • Explain how young children acquire fundamental skills and concepts.
  • Create developmentally appropriate instruction as it relates to concepts, attitudes, and skills.
  • Defend the importance of utilizing symbols and higher-level activities in the early childhood classroom.
  • Construct activities that promote the learning of whole numbers, patterns, and fractions for the primary grades.
  • Construct activities that promote the learning of numbers, geometry, and measurement for the primary grades.
  • Prepare developmentally appropriate scientific investigation lessons relative to concepts, attitudes, and skills for the primary grades.
  • Set up a productive math and science environment.

Credit Hours: 3

EC410 - Cultural Diversity  

When working with children, it is important to realize that the environment and family a child is growing up in directly affects the way the child thinks, learns, and behaves. This course is a sociological overview of the ways cultural diversity influences children's behavior, communication, and learning styles; it also gives suggestions for teachers in working with children from diverse backgrounds.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills.
  • Demonstrate computer and information literacy.
  • Identify the long-term benefits of childhood programs and how cultural differences affect education.
  • Analyze how poverty and culture affect child-rearing practices.
  • Prepare curriculum and instruction strategies for young English learners.
  • Create a week's lesson plan for a preschool class.

Credit Hours: 3

EC420 - Exceptional Children  

In today's classroom there is an array of children with many different needs and abilities. It is important for teachers to be prepared to meet each child's individual needs while making each child feel like a vital part of the learning community. This course is an introduction to the special needs of children with developmental disabilities, and how to implement programs that include these children in an early childhood classroom. Inclusion is not only beneficial for the child with special needs, it is beneficial for all the children in the classroom as they develop a sense of community and an acceptance of diversity.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe how to teach a child with special needs through partnering with the family.
  • Construct individualized intervention plans and programs for students with special needs.
  • Choose instructional programs that meet the needs of students with specific disabilities.
  • Summarize how to promote emotional and social development of students with special needs.
  • Synthesize how to develop motor and self-help skills in young children.
  • Explain the importance of cultivating communication skills for students with special needs.
  • Explain the developmental sequence of thinking and reasoning.
  • Summarize the importance of collaboration, problem solving, and consultation.

Credit Hours: 3

EC440 - Creating Learning Environments  

This course is designed to help students explore early childhood environments and curriculum that will enhance the learning and development of young children. It focuses on creating healthy, safe, and emotionally supportive environments that facilitate and promote learning in a variety of areas - literacy, math, science, art, music, play, etc.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss the importance of an emotionally supportive and equitable classroom environment.
  • Establish a context for learning through a play-based curriculum.
  • Design an effective learning environment.
  • Explain the importance of dramatic play, manipulative, sensory, block and building, literacy, science, math, art, and music centers.
  • Describe the appropriate materials needed and placement of each learning center.
  • Integrate technology into the classroom, focusing on age appropriateness.
  • Explain the value of outdoor environments.
  • Discuss the challenges when creating space for families, teachers, and sharing space.

Credit Hours: 3

Healthcare Management

HE310 - Survey of Healthcare Management  

A comprehensive overview of the healthcare industry. You will build strong critical thinking and analytical skills that you will need as a future healthcare administrator. This course will examine the full scope of responsibilities associated with the position of healthcare administrator. Topics of discussion include finance, human resources, risk assessment, crisis management, compliance, internal and external audits, and quality assessment/control, and performance improvement, as well as legal and ethical concerns as they relate to the healthcare industry.
Credit Hours: 3

HE320 - Medical Sociology  

Analyzes social factors in relation to health and disease. Consideration will be given to definitions of health, illness behavior, the formal and informal organization of health professions and institutions, and the expanding role of government in the health field. Use will be made of both theory and current research. Social issues and health care will also be examined and include poverty and health delivery systems, abortion, euthanasia, child abuse, and old age.
Credit Hours: 3

HE330 - Healthcare Delivery Systems  

Provides a current and comprehensive overview of the basic structures and developments of the U.S. health system. The historical origins, resources, individual services, cost, and quality will be explored. The topics to be covered include the continuum of care, concepts methods and theories in healthcare delivery systems, and computer applications in healthcare.
Credit Hours: 3

HE350 - Healthcare Human Resource Management  

Designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of healthcare human resources management. The course begins with an overview of human resources within a healthcare organization. Training, compensation, recruiting, staffing, training, and performance management are examined. This foundation is used to examine how the human resources professional manages careers, compensation, labor relations, safety and health of employees, and discipline and procedural justice.
Credit Hours: 3

HE360 - Healthcare Economics  

An in-depth look at how healthcare delivery and economics affect each other. In this course, you will focus on how healthcare costs are determined, which industries influence healthcare decisions, how supply and demand impact health care, who the key participants and drivers are, and how effectiveness of healthcare delivery maximizes resources. You will also explore national health care coverage, tools for navigating economic feasibility, and cost-benefit analysis with the goal of providing optimal health care for recipients.
Credit Hours: 3

HE380 - Managed Healthcare  

Presents an overview of major issues related to the design, function, management, regulation, and evaluation of health insurance and managed care plans. Provides a firm foundation in basic concepts pertaining to private and public sector health insurance/benefit plans, both as provided by employers and government agencies such as Medicaid and Medicare.
Credit Hours: 3

HE400 - Cultural Diversity in Healthcare  

Presents cultural perspectives about health care practices. Many diverse cultures are described in rich detail with respect to their similarities and differences. Their individual perspectives on such topics as worldview of health, illness etiology, religion, and health promotion are reveiwed. Health barriers and the Affordable Care Act are described to provide ways to effectively communicate and treat people from different cultures.
Credit Hours: 3

HE420 - Healthcare Finance & Accounting  

A comprehensive analysis of financially managing a healthcare organization. Students are introduced to financial terminology and how it is used in organizational analysis. Evaluation of financial statements provides insight as to necessities of effective planning, staffing, inventory management, budgeting, and benchmarking. Lastly, the benefits of electronic record implementation are explored along with how it is being supported by the World Health Organization.
Credit Hours: 3

HE450 - Leadership in Healthcare  

Explores the leadership skills required in the healthcare industry by looking at how effective leaders embrace the inevitability of constant change and diversity. Master leaders use their interpersonal skills to promote change, communicate vision, provide a sense of direction, and inspire employees. In this course, you will gain insight into various models for leadership and leadership styles. You will also learn how the medical field is shaping a new community-based approach to care that supports patient satisfaction.
Credit Hours: 3

HE470 - Medical Law and Ethics  

In this course, you will learn about how medical law and ethics are interwoven and help define and strengthen healthcare delivery. You will learn about how both providers and patients have rights and work together to provide optimal health. In addition, you will learn about workplace safety, protection of medical records, ethical considerations, and future trends and benefits in the healthcare environment.
Credit Hours: 3

Management

BM350 - Marketing Management  

Marketing Management, BM350, reviews the bedrock principles and theories of marketing, including strategic planning, marketing research, the marketing mix, building brands, and communicating value. Specialized fields such as service marketing and business marketing are presented.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Present the essentials of marketing and marketing management theories, concepts, and models.
  • Identify and discuss the tools and methodologies used to solve marketing management problems.
  • Compare and contrast the processes that influence buying behavior in business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets.
  • Explain the concept of branding, key ingredients of brand equity, and the strategic brand management process.
  • Examine the role competition plays in expanding and defending market share.
  • Discuss the classifications of products, elements of product design, and how to manage a product mix and product lines.
  • Analyze pricing and demonstrate the psychology of pricing of products and services.
  • Describe the elements of the promotional mix and determine which are the most favorable for certain products and services.

Credit Hours: 3

BU330 - Accounting for Managers  

Welcome to the world of Accounting for Managers! It's a practical world of analysis interpretation and problem solving. You'll have to work through transactions, complete calculations and financial statements, and analyze and interpret your results to answer the questions. You'll also need to keep your eye on the goal of sound decision making. Understanding how to apply what you learn in this Accounting for Managers course to everyday business situations can help make you a more effective decision maker. May your judgment be sound and your choices lead you to success.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate effective written and interpersonal skills.
  • Demonstrate job-specific technical and professional skills.
  • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills.
  • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills.
  • Analyze the various concepts related to managerial accounting and cost accounting.
  • Explain the different tools of management used for the decision-making process.
  • Identify the various budget analysis processes and the performance measurements for decision making.
  • Analyze the various components of capital budgeting, cash flow statements, and ratio analysis.
  • Solve examples of real-world accounting problems using knowledge of accounting forms and equations.

Credit Hours: 3

BU340 - Managerial Finance I  

Financial management integrates concepts from economics, accounting, management, and other business disciplines to forge a sound basis on which the firm can predict risk, return, and cash flows for operating and strategic decisions. This enables financial managers to manage the firm's resources and maximize return to the firm's shareholders, a central goal of most corporations. Topics include financial management, the time value of money, interest, stocks, and bonds.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the effects of financial planning on strategy.
  • Measure risk and calculate the risk-adjusted discount rate.
  • Calculate the value of money at different points in time.
  • Evaluate bonds and calculate bond yields.
  • Determine the price of common and preferred stock.
  • Assess investments using net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return methods.
  • Compute a firm's cash flow components.
  • Explain how financial institutions determine discount and investment rates.

Credit Hours: 3

BU350 - Organizational Behavior  

Focusing on the people in the organization and how they work and behave, this course examines the behavior of individuals, the dynamics of teamwork, the processes of small groups, decision-making, problem solving, and conflict management. The course also discusses how to motivate people and improve employee performance, provide feedback, and use rewards and positive reinforcement.
Credit Hours: 3

BU440 - Managerial Finance II  

This course explores the concepts, techniques, and tools used for financial decision making at strategic, tactical, and operational levels of a firm including capital structure planning, financing decisions, working capital management, and financial management for multinational corporations.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisite: BU340

BU450 - Leadership Skills  

Providing a basic foundation to equip students for future leadership activities in business, government, and society, this course explores the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. It also demonstrates skills needed to promote change, communicate vision, provide a sense of direction, and inspire employees.
Credit Hours: 3

BU470 - Strategic Management  

Strategic management may sound uninteresting on the surface, but as you'll see in this course, there are many interesting aspects to strategic management and knowing how a firm can have a competitive advantage in the marketplace! BU470 is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, models, and theories of strategic management by looking at case analyses, analyzing external environments, evaluating internal capabilities, and exploring useful strategies. The emphasis of the course is on the successful implementation of strategies in different types of firms across industries to gain an advantage over all their competitors.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Define strategy and the strategic management process.
  • Describe external environment and how it affects the decisions and performance of a firm.
  • Describe how a firm analyzes its internal capabilities and why it is essential to an organization.
  • Explain cost leadership and the benefits of the cost leadership strategy.
  • Define product differentiation and explain how it can create economic value.
  • Discuss the strategies of flexibility and real options and how they benefit a firm.
  • Summarize explicit and tacit collusion and the issues associated with the decision to collude.

Credit Hours: 3

BU490 - Business Ethics  

This course examines ethics and values in business, investigating the moral responsibilities within the organization, reviewing several approaches to examining ethical issues, and examining justice from the perspectives of procedures, compensation, and retribution. The role of moral leadership in business and an examination of ethical dilemmas created by an expanding global economy are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3

BZ380 - Management Information Systems  

BZ380 focuses on understanding information systems that today's managers use to make decisions and analyze production and performance in a business environment. The student will be able to identify the challenges facing firms today, understand the technologies that will help them meet these challenges, design business processes to take advantage of the technologies, and describe management procedures and policies to implement the required changes. The student will also be able to understand what the role of information systems is concerning project and global management.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize information systems and the global business environment.
  • Relate how organizations use information systems in a strategic manner.
  • Synthesize information technology and the management of data.
  • Explain how telecommunication networks operate and employ security.
  • Categorize and relate the use and applications of enterprise systems and e-commerce.
  • Relate how managing knowledge in business with work systems and business intelligence assists managerial decisions.
  • Summarize project and systems development management as each relates to goals and risks.
  • Synthesize global management and internationalization of information systems.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ400 - Strategic Information Technology  

This course will improve your decision making about technology. You will learn to identify major technologies that can increase competitive advantage. You will learn how to avoid some of the implementation traps that can lead to failed projects with careful planning. After completing this course, you will be able to diagnose choice technologies, organize your thinking about technology in helpful ways, and then analyze them in ways to help make technology a valuable strategic differentiator. You will learn how laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley are forcing organizations to align business processes with technology.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Summarize how information systems have evolved utilizing various strategies.
  • Synthesize management of information system infrastructure and electronic commerce.
  • Relate the use of social media in the business environment for communication.
  • Support the use of business intelligence, its components, and its integration with databases.
  • Describe core business processes and implementation of enterprise resource planning systems.
  • Evaluate the impact of supply chain management and customer relationship management on organizations.
  • Explain how companies invest in technology and the processes used in securing technology.
  • Appraise how information security is threatened, controlled, and managed.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ420 - Human Resources Management  

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles of human resources management. The course begins with an overview and legal aspects. Work analysis and workforce planning, recruiting, staffing, training, and performance management are also evaluated. This foundation is used to synthesize how the human resources professional manages careers, compensation, labor relations, safety and health of employees, and discipline and procedural justice. The course concludes by evaluating related concepts in a global context.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Evaluate a strategic HR plan for an organization and the role of the HR manager.
  • Interpret the role played by HR in personnel planning, recruiting, and creating job requirements.
  • Design an employee training and development program that addresses key deficits in these areas.
  • Synthesize performance appraisal criteria for multiple positions in an organization.
  • Delineate the methods used to create an employee benefit and incentive plan.
  • Critically interpret employment discrimination and labor laws to deal effectively with employment issues on the job.
  • Evaluate the methods for managing legal, health, safety, and ethical issues in the workplace.
  • Assess the need for global HR expansion, including a hiring strategy that best suits the new business environment.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ460 - Project Management  

In this course, the student will first learn about project management, including the project manager's responsibility to the project. Topics to be discussed include the role of the project manager in managing the project life cycle, including defining tasks, scheduling, allocating resources, monitoring, and controlling. Tools, techniques, and tips for project management will also be presented. Once this is accomplished, the student will delve into the detailed requirements of project planning.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Outline the primary goals of project management, as well as the planning process and project life cycle.
  • Explain how projects are identified and selected, along with the proposal solicitation process.
  • Describe the project scope document, quality, how to define what activities need to be done, who will be responsible for them, and in what sequence they will be performed.
  • Discuss monitoring and controlling the progress of the project, replanning, and updating the project schedule.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the resource requirements plan, forecasting project cost at completion, controlling project costs, and managing cash flow.
  • Explain how to identify risks and their potential impact, risk response planning, and controlling risks.
  • Describe the characteristics of effective project teams and team management.
  • Explain an element vital to the effective performance of a project: communication.

Credit Hours: 3

BZ480 - International Management  

This course deals with the issues affecting multinational corporation managers in a global business environment. Its primary focus is on understanding, respecting, and working within the parameters of a variety of cultures affecting the outcomes of all dimensions of business and management operations. These dimensions include, but are not limited to, business communication and negotiation, management decision making, strategy formulation and implementation; organizational structure and control; staffing, training, and compensation for global operations; and motivation and leadership from a multinational, multicultural set of perspectives.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Discuss reasons why managers engage in global marketplaces and their subsequent rights and ethical responsibilities.
  • Explain how managers develop cultural intelligence to facilitate international cross-cultural communication.
  • Describe how analyses and models are utilized to enter a global market.
  • Compare cultural behavior and communication complexities in international business management.
  • Interpret how strategy and alliances provide the framework for international managerial success.
  • Synthesize how strategic planning, staffing, and international human resource management present management with challenges and opportunities.
  • Appraise how international management operates among various cultures and labor relation systems.
  • Summarize how global cultures impact international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Marketing

BM350 - Marketing Management  

Marketing Management, BM350, reviews the bedrock principles and theories of marketing, including strategic planning, marketing research, the marketing mix, building brands, and communicating value. Specialized fields such as service marketing and business marketing are presented.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Present the essentials of marketing and marketing management theories, concepts, and models.
  • Identify and discuss the tools and methodologies used to solve marketing management problems.
  • Compare and contrast the processes that influence buying behavior in business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets.
  • Explain the concept of branding, key ingredients of brand equity, and the strategic brand management process.
  • Examine the role competition plays in expanding and defending market share.
  • Discuss the classifications of products, elements of product design, and how to manage a product mix and product lines.
  • Analyze pricing and demonstrate the psychology of pricing of products and services.
  • Describe the elements of the promotional mix and determine which are the most favorable for certain products and services.

Credit Hours: 3

BM380 - Marketing Research  

This course describes the latest marketing research processes, techniques, and methodologies that produce marketing insights, with an emphasis on the role the Internet plays in marketing research. Topics include privacy and online data collection, descriptive and causal research designs, qualitative and quantitative data analysis, and communicating marketing research findings.
Credit Hours: 3

BM410 - Sales Management & Practices  

In this course, Sales Management and Practices, students will be provided with an analysis of professional selling practices with emphasis on the selling process and sales management, including the development of territories, determining potentials and forecasts, and setting quotas. Included is a discussion of sales ethics, legal regulations that affect the sales environment, and how a sales manager can model ethical behavior effectively within the salesforce.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Analyze the basic and essential principles and concepts of personal selling and sales management in the global marketplace.
  • Evaluate sales management strategies and organizational structures.
  • Outline the key activities in planning and executing a program for salesforce recruitment and selection.
  • Describe methods for assessing sales training needs and the sales training process as a series of six interrelated steps.
  • Distinguish between salesforce leadership, management, and supervision.
  • Explain the key components of motivation and the guidelines for motivating and rewarding salespeople.
  • Describe how to perform different methods of sales analysis for different organizational levels and different types of sales.
  • Explain how salesperson performance information can be used to identify problems, determine their causes, and suggest sales management actions to solve them.

Credit Hours: 3

BM440 - Internet Marketing  

This course presents a framework to help students and practitioners understand how to think about and implement effective Internet marketing programs. The course also provides an overview of electronic marketing tools and how these tools can be integrated into the marketing process.
Credit Hours: 3

BU460 - Electronic Commerce  

This course introduces the managerial applications of Internet technology for a successful Web-based organization. The course examines the application of management principles to electronic business models, including business-to-consumer, business-to-business, and intra-business commercial ventures. It also presents the strategic application of EC principles to the process of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational processes, adding value to current business practices, and driving the development of new value-added activities.
Credit Hours: 3

BU480 - eBusiness Strategy  

E-Business Strategy addresses the new technological environment that businesses are facing by exploring strategic considerations related to technology and technology implementation. The course also examines the basics of the marketing exchange by utilizing social media, database marketing, interactive telecommunications, and other e-business techniques.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Assess how the new technological environment will impact business activity.
  • Describe the strategic planning process and the external environment within which an organization operates.
  • Describe the virtual value chain and how companies move from managing an internal value chain to operating along a value network.
  • Explain the impact of the Internet on business goals and activities.
  • Explain how the value-process framework integrates the value chain and the five forces analyses, including the relationship between strategy formulation and the concepts of value creation and value capturing.
  • Compare and contrast the various organizational structures for e-business activities.
  • Describe how to implement and utilize digital customer relationship management (CRM) and mobile e-commerce.
  • Explain the e-business strategy formulation roadmap and how to link the steps of the roadmap to the different parts of the e-business strategy framework.

Credit Hours: 3

BU490 - Business Ethics  

This course examines ethics and values in business, investigating the moral responsibilities within the organization, reviewing several approaches to examining ethical issues, and examining justice from the perspectives of procedures, compensation, and retribution. The role of moral leadership in business and an examination of ethical dilemmas created by an expanding global economy are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3