Healthcare Management Degree Online

Earn your bachelor's degree in Healthcare Management online at Madison School of Healthcare. Our nationally accredited program was designed by healthcare educators and industry experts and will give you the theoretical and practical skills you’ll need to compete in the healthcare industry. You’ll gain working knowledge of fundamental subjects, such as Medical Sociology, Healthcare Delivery Systems, Managed Healthcare, and Medical Law and Ethics.

Our healthcare management degree online program is a flexible 8-semester bachelor's degree program. The flexible enrollment model allows you to enroll one semester at a time, completing each semester at your own pace or in as few as 6 months each. Access to academic and account support is always available over the phone, via email, or online in the Student Portal.

Curriculum

Semester 1

OR110 - Achieving Academic Excellence 

Achieve your true potential! This course will help you sharpen existing skills, build on your strengths, and discover the best ways to learn. You'll identify your learning styles, learn new behaviors to ensure college success, and maximize your learning as you complete your program of study.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Identify personal strengths and traits used to succeed in motivating and setting goals to complete higher education.
  • Describe the requirements for successful online learning.
  • Discuss the value of goal setting and time management.
  • Explain methods to achieve effective reading comprehension and note-taking.
  • Recognize effective academic writing and types of plagiarism.
  • Describe strategies for online testing.
  • Explain the role of critical thinking in problem solving.
  • Identify the necessary skills for successful online research.

Credit Hours: 3

C10 - Introduction to Computers  

Introduction to Computers provides you with foundational skills and knowledge needed for today's technology-based careers. You'll study the components of systems — from the CPU and memory to input devices and peripherals — and how these components interact with an operating system to perform critical tasks. Keeping current with fast changing computer technologies, this course will discuss the computer technologies today that allow the creation of a virtualized mobile workforce. It will explore how computers connect to the internet, what services can be found online, and what dangers exist in the form of viruses, Trojans, and other malware. The course will also familiarize you with the basics of today's office productivity applications and help to establish a foundation for working with these different types of applications, including spreadsheets and presentation-creation tools.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Identify all of the major types of computing devices and their internal and external components.
  • Compile a list of the various computer operating systems that are used today and identify characteristics about each one.
  • Relate the various cloud-based technologies to the virtual and remote abilities that are available for working professionals today.
  • Discuss the various office productivity suite applications today.
  • Illustrate basic office software tasks using Microsoft Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote.
  • Characterize how the networking of computers is so vital today and identify the various networking technologies that are used today.
  • List the hardware components, software applications, and IT protocols that make the internet possible today.
  • Apply basic maintenance tasks on your computer to combat viruses, malware, and computing inefficiencies.

Credit Hours: 3

EN120 - English Composition I  

This course introduces basic writing skills that are especially relevant to academic assignments. The course focuses on APA paragraph development and organization in conjunction with a review of basic grammar and mechanics. The course also covers basic techniques for critically editing and revising your work.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Use appropriate style, grammar, and mechanics in writing assignments.
  • Compose a strong paragraph with attention to the following: topic sentences; unity, coherence, and different approaches to ordering ideas; effective use of transitions.
  • Identify and use a variety of essay structures, including expository, descriptive, narrative, comparison and contrast, and persuasion/argumentative.
  • Organize, develop, and produce a fully developed 5-paragraph essay.
  • Differentiate and apply correct techniques for prewriting, writing, and proofreading using a variety of styles.
  • Correctly apply the rules of APA for use in direct or indirect quotations and reference citations.

Credit Hours: 3

SO245 - Social Impact of Technology  

This course provides an overview of technological advances over the span of human history. Topics include the interrelationship of technology and culture; ethics and morals as they relate to technological progress; energy; ecology; demography; war and politics; and the unintended consequences of globalization, including social inequality, climate change, and global warming.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Explain how technology and culture are interrelated, and outline technological advances from ancient times to the present.
  • Discuss different perspectives on ethics and morals as they relate to technological applications.
  • Explain basic concepts related to energy, including the pros and cons of nonrenewable and renewable sources of energy.
  • Discuss basic concepts of ecology, including the environmental challenges of global warming and climate change.
  • Explain basic concepts of demography, especially as they apply to population growth.
  • Describe how war and politics have affected nations as they adapted to advances in technologies.
  • Explain the origins of global inequality, including colonialism and capitalism.
  • Discuss different approaches to measuring the evolution of technologies, the unintended consequences of globalization, and the prospects of a paradigm shift.

Credit Hours: 3

H03 - Medical Terminology  

This course will familiarize students with medical terminology and the structure of the human body. Lessons are organized based on the systems of the human body including the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, digestive, respiratory, nervous, reproductive, cardiovascular, blood and lymphatic systems. Oncology, radiology, and nuclear medicine are also presented.
Credit Hours: 3

Semester 2

EN130 - English Composition II  

The ability to communicate well is essential to success in any professional environment. This course is organized to provide you with a broad understanding of multiple types of written communication. Far from being just academic exercises, formal writing skills allow you to relate to the world in ever increasing ways. Simply put, good writing is good thinking. As you master various techniques of effective writing, you'll note a change in the way you process information, and those around you (including your employer) will also note the transformation.

EN130 begins with the assumption that you've attained basic writing skills through completion of EN120. So, in fact, EN130 is a continuation of EN120. In that light, you'll be expected to access and review basic concepts covered in EN120 and, in particular, the sections on grammar and mechanics.

English Composition II begins by offering you tips on college writing, active reading, and study strategies at the college level. Next, you'll explore the framework for drafting a college essay, including elaborated explorations for finding a topic, assessing your audience, and determining the purpose of your essay as you identify its thesis and craft a thesis statement.

Next, because college essays often require research, you'll be introduced to strategies for finding and using sources. Based on this preparatory foundation, you'll be challenged to analyze essays in all of the various rhetorical modes, which, in turn, will prepare you to write college-level essays for these different patterns of development.

The balance of this online text is devoted to the specifics of reading, analyzing, and writing college-level essays, including description, narration, illustration, process analysis, comparison and contrast, classification and division, definition, cause and effect, argument, and business applications.

By the end of this course, you'll be able to do the following:

  • Describe the nature of academic writing at the college level.
  • Understand and apply the principles of active reading.
  • Comprehend and apply the structure of a college essay.
  • Develop an essay thesis that's supported by facts, authorities, and examples.
  • Apply the principles of revision and editing.
  • Write an academic essay supported by relevant and credible sources.
  • Critically evaluate essays in all of these patterns of development, including: Narrative, Descriptive, Illustration, Process, Comparison and contrast, Definition, Classification and division, Cause and effect, Argument.
  • Create effective, engaging, and informative essays in all of these patterns of discourse through: A deep understanding of the writing process; Organizing an essay in terms of space order, time order, or order of importance; Creating attention-getting introductions and memorable conclusions; Using facts, logical reasoning, examples, and authorities to support your thesis; Identifying and avoiding logical fallacies; Effectively applying the techniques of persuasion; Blending two or more patterns of development in a single essay.

Credit Hours: 3

General Education Elective (Science 100-200 Level)   H01 - Medical Office Management I  

This course provides an overview of medical office topics, including typical happenings in a medical office, an introduction to medical terminology, insurance processing and coding, safety issues, communications issues, interacting with patients, and records management.
Credit Hours: 3

H02 - Medical Office Management II  

This course is a continuation of Medical Office Management I, providing a look at the disease process, physical examination, laboratory procedures, diagnostic equipment, nutrition, medications, specialty practices, physical therapy, and responding to medical emergencies.
Credit Hours: 3

H06 - Health Records Management  

This course introduces most of the records used in a medical office. Students will see examples of these records, study their contents, and learn how these records are used, shared, and stored by the medical office. Students will also learn about the relationships among these records and medical care, legal, and insurance or billing concerns.
Credit Hours: 3

SHOW ALL CURRICULUM

Program Details

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Management program is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills that they can apply in a variety of healthcare related career settings. The program lays the foundation for a broad base of knowledge with general education courses in a variety of subject areas. In addition, specialty core courses within the program discipline focus on the managerial, financial, logistical and ethical aspects of healthcare, enabling students to become well-rounded professionals in their chosen field.

Your Healthcare Management Program Includes:

  • Textbook and/or comprehensive online resources
  • Online course materials and assessments
  • Access to Academic Advisors
  • Personalized faculty feedback on all written assessments
  • Access to a Learning Resource Center and Library via Proquest
  • Ability to interact with peer students, faculty and staff via Madison’s Online Community
  • Ability to track academic progress and manage account information via the student portal
  • Opportunity to participate in our live graduation ceremony

Being here made me feel a part of something and I really would recommend it for anybody. There is no reason not to go to school, especially with a place like this, because it’s giving you the opportunity to better yourself and gain a sense of accomplishment.

— Susan Donaldson, Recent Graduate

Tuition

Madison School of Healthcare offers bachelor degree in Healthcare Management tuition that is affordable. Enroll and begin your studies at any time, and choose the low monthly payment that works with your budget.

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Career Outlook

Healthcare management jobs are plentiful and stable once you establish yourself in the industry. Earning a bachelor’s degree in Healthcare Management is a wise choice and your first step toward career advancement and income growth. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts the creation of 56,300 new jobs in medical and health services management through 2024. Healthcare managers coordinate the execution of medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, private practices and more. Some of the most in-demand positions include practice administrator, pharmaceutical sales, medical administrative assistant, health records clerk, health insurance specialist, patient access specialist, healthcare marketing director and more.

17%
JOB GROWTH
The U.S. Department of Labor predicts a 17% increase in medical and health services manager careers by 2024.

FAQs

Are there any prerequisites for Madison’s healthcare management degree program?

The only requirement to enroll in Madison’s healthcare management degree program is a high school diploma or GED.

What features should I look for in Madison School of Healthcare’s healthcare management bachelor's degree online program compared to other schools’ programs?

It’s important that the program you choose includes the relevant courses you need to pursue a career in the healthcare management field. Look for a program that covers the important concepts you need to know and focuses on the skills that you need to start your career. Your program should include specific lessons on medical terminology, medical office management, and proper coding of diagnoses and medical procedures, healthcare system information management including electronic health records and other important healthcare topics. Once you graduate, you should be able to enter Madison’s Master of Science or MBA programs without any additional academic preparation.

Is the training all online or do I get books?

Your course content is delivered via online course materials and assessments. Textbooks and/or comprehensive online resources are also included with your program tuition.

Does Madison accept transfer credits?

Yes. Madison School of Healthcare accepts eligible transfer credits from previously attended colleges and universities for candidates in our Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree programs. Our Registrar will evaluate your credits and let you know what credits are eligible for transfer toward your degree. We also offer life/work experience credit.

State Requirements

A career in this field may require you to meet certain licensing, training, and other requirements that can vary by vocation and state. Check with your state, local government, and/or licensing board to find out which requirements may be applicable in your state. Click here for contact information on state licensing/regulatory boards and certain professional licensing information.

Ready to Get Started?

Earn your Healthcare Management Degree online on your terms. Call 1-800-600-6253 or enroll online today.

Career Outlook Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition, Medical and Health Services Managers (May 5, 2016).